How to use crimping tool

Guys,
when you use crimping tools does it matter which side of connector goes under
tooth of
crimping tool? The part where two ends of connectors "neck" tube meet or other
side?
BTW I have a stripping/crimping tool like this one:
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Thanks,
Alex
Reply to
Alex
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I usually crimp the seam-side. The theory being the edges of the metal bite into the wire. The best crimper IMHO is the Calterm 1250. Did a google, but couldn't find a link. JR Dweller in the cellar
Alex wrote:
Reply to
JR North
I find the other way works better and is more consistent YMMV.
Reply to
Wayne Cook
Are these better quality crimpers have wider jaws? Mine don't actually "crimp" terminal but make a deep dent with it's narrow tooth in terminal neck destroying insulation in the process. I normally make a couple of them otherwise it doesn't hold wire too good.
JR North wrote:
Reply to
Alex
Crimping tools are for people who never learnt how to solder.
Andrew VK3BFA.
Reply to
Andrew VK3BFA
Not necessarily! It depends on the circumstance where either soldering or crimping is more practical.
I consider myself a master in soldering electrical connectors from years of experience in the industry but I still use crimpers more often when working with military avionics. Crimping is actually the better and preferred method in 90% of the work.
Reply to
<1577_Ar23
The tooth of the crimper should press the split side of the connector! If you use it the other way there's a possibility you may separate the connecting section into a "Y" shape.
Reply to
<1577_Ar23
"Andrew VK3BFA" wrote
Actually almost every standard for wiring in high vibration situations discourage solder. Marine and automotive especially. Solder can creep out into unsupported strands and increase the possibility of fatigue failure. ABYC, Lloyds and several other marine standards strongly recommend crimp rings only.
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
I'm having a problem with the question: that crimper does not have a "tooth", it has a pair of "yokes" that squeeze equally on both sides of the connector.
Alex wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Crimpers come in various designs! If your crimper has a design that does dot have a "tooth" then it is not what is being discussed in this thread.
Reply to
<1577_Ar23
I was taught that the split where it's folded together goes in the saddle, and the tooth presses on the solid side. There is a possibility of spreading the split apart if you do it the other way. Just my opinion though.
Reply to
whiskers69
And you are wrong. I just looked at the crimper in the picture, it is one of those barely servicable models, you could do just as good a job with a pair af vise grips as with that Boston tool.
Reply to
whiskers69
Uh, the guy included a link to a photo of the tool. It does not have anything that I would describe as a "tooth".
Reply to
J. Clarke
Take a look at
and you'll find several compound-lever tools for insulated terminals that I think you will find much more satisfactory than the tool that you are using.
Reply to
J. Clarke
Alex wrote in news:RWrQf.57890$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com:
You need a set of good crimpers such as these
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Reply to
Anthony
These tend to do a bad job. I'd crimp in two places with such a tool.
If you do lots of crimping, this is good tool:
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the dies won't crush the insulation on the terminal, and it will compress the metal inside as well as some of the plastic around the wire that hangs out. Good crimp terminals make a difference too. Crappy ones split or break apart.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
Agreed. I've seen to many done the other way where only one half of the split is pressed down.
Reply to
Wayne Cook
And I suppose that AMP industies should stop making a direct knock off the tool that was referenced.
1577 snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
I looked at the manual of this tool. It is a way better tool. It compresses the metal all around wire. It should also take a lot mot more pressure to do it vs. cheap "tooth into the metal" design therefore ratcheting is necessary.
Cydrome Leader wrote:
Reply to
Alex
I was told by the 'Ideal' crimper dealer that the "toothed" crimper was for use on NON insulated lugs. (tooth to the lug side opposite to the seam) and the 'non toothed' crimper was used on INSULATED lugs. (Doesn't damage the insulation ) Been doin' crimps that way for years with no apparent ill effects. YMMV rgentry_at_oz_dot_net _AT_ = @, _dot_ = . to eMail
Reply to
Bob Gentry

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