Crimping Tools Alternate Uses Hand Crimper

I've found that a very good way to expand one's collection of very versatile and handy tools is to find some of the great bargains available in surplus
used tools.
Some tools may not still pass certifications for their original intended uses, but a well designed, quality, durable tool can still be utilized effectively for other purposes.
Some of the specific-use, commercial or areospace hand crimp tools from AMP, T&B, Hirose, Daniels, and many other quality tool manufacturers can cost over $800 each when checking new prices ($300-400 is common).
Many types have hardened precision-machined jaws, forged steel frames, compound action handles for ease of use to apply serious force to the workpiece, adjustability in the mechanism for recertification or custom applications.
Numerous brands of tools are intended for bare, flagged/tabbed U-shaped contacts, form (3-shaped closures where the ends of the tabs are forced to point into the center as the crimp is completed.
Many tools for insulated terminal applications form diamond-shaped, W-shaped, () flattened-round shapes or U-shaped impressions.
Daniels, Winchester, Buchanan and others typically have 4 radially oriented pin-jaws to crimp inward on bare cylindrical connector terminals.
Hex crimpers deform round metal shapes to the extent that there is essentially zero spring-back, ensuring a permanent, very secure grip.
One should never have unreasonable expectations of using an improvised crimp for anything related to proper electrical connections or mechanical safety-related applications/items, but for general purpose utility-type uses, a crimped metal sleeve may be far more practical than a knot or fastener.
Gamefish anglers have been using crimp sleeves on their lure leaders and tackle for generations.
Some folks are satisfied with using a hammer to close metallic tubular part onto another material, and call it done. I know there are numerous RCM'ers that enjoy using a little more finesse, and achieving repeatable, results that exhibit a more skillfully executed appearance, in most things they do.
The two common types of frame styles are F-style, where the user has easy access to various crimp nests/jaws at the open part of the F. The enclosed-head style of frames o= require the user to insert the terminal into the opening from the side, and then take the terminal out from the same side.
One could see that the F-style crimp tool could fairly easily be modified to set small, soft rivets, brass grommets or pins, near the edges of materials (sheetmetal) by a few modifications to the existing jaws, or making a replacement jaw set. Jaws could be fabricated which can deform small sections of soft wire into miniature rivets.
The heavy duty F-style forged steel frames are essentially a Roper-Whitney-type punch frame with a 90 degree head.. fairly easily modified to use as a punch. These F-style frames are a portable, miniature presses that can be modified for a multitude of bending pressing or forming tasks.
I've been finding numerous examples of the very durable, versatile hand crimp tools on eBay for $10 plus a little shipping, or less.
There are usually an abundance of commonly available materials to use for crimping. Brass, copper, aluminum or thin steel tubing or metallic eyelets, etc.
Crimping a sort length of tubing onto the ends of small diameter wire rope (garage door cable) will ensure that the end doesn't get frayed. Copper, brass or nickel silver tips on your shoelace ends, if you'd care to.
I suspect that there are a wide variety of uses for many of the durable, slightly worn, surplus deal crimp tools.
--
WB
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    [ ... ]

    Right. AMP calls these "Type F"

    AMP does both the diamond-shaped (for the insulation crimp) and "()" shaped (for the connection crimp).
    In the smaller sizes, they alternate by forming one dot, or two in the "()" area, depending on size -- so you can tell whether the correct size crimper was used on the terminal. (The terminals are color-coded to make the size easy to see even if you can't see the markings in the connection tab.)
    [ ... ]

    Until you get to the larger sizes. AMP uses two sizes of hydraulic heads for sizes between 8 Ga and 2 Ga, and for sizes between 1-0 and 4-0. These sizes all form the actual size into the insulation on crimping.
    Anyway -- these have a very heavy frame which has a fixed hinge pin on one side (circlips in grooves), and a removable pin on the other side (knurled head and spring-loaded ball detent at the other end. The joining parts of these are like the knuckles of two hands around a pencil -- something which can handle the rather high crimping forces. (The pumps for these heads produce 8400 PSI before the release trips. So if you know the diameter of the pistons you can calculate the actual forces.) I think that the smaller set has about a 1-1/4" piston (I've never taken it apart to see), which would be about 3280 pounds of crimping force, and the larger is closer to 2-1/2" diameter (13,125 pounds force).
    Anyway -- this design allows you to open the head after crimping, to remove the wire and terminal (if the resulting crimped terminal is too big to pull through the opening, as it often is in those sizes).

    The AMP crimpers for 10 to 12 Ga terminals (yellow) are called "Heavy head", and have a liner crimp, but an open side.
    I must admit that I hate to think of the good AMP crimpers being re-purposed -- but sometimes this may be the best use. I know of one "heavy head" which a friend has which has the cycle control ratchet assembly broken -- making this better used for perhaps setting rivets than for crimping terminals. (And you might have to disable the ratchets in others to re-purpose them depending on the intended purpose.)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Thanks for the additional details, DoN.. it's always good to have pertinent info added, just in case anyone still checks archived posts.
I have just bought another T&B forged steel crimping tool, and there's not a piece of plastic or sheet steel to be found in it's construction as far as functional strength (there are 2 steel washers used to center the ratchet pawl in the frame opening).
The (improvised term) F-style tool I referred to earlier, I used to describe the type of tool that resembles the old adjustable Ford "monkey" wrench.
The o= symbol was used to represent the other handheld style of tool, where the die nest is located within a closed section of the tool frame.
Some of the AMP (Tyco) Type-C hand tools have a very broad head with opposed sections that close toward each other, in a straight line (not one stationary).. in the same motion of a vise with a compound screw that has LH-RH threads. http://cgi.ebay.com/B-AMP-Type-C-Crimp-45099-Terminal-Crimper-Crimpers-/300371120497 Item # 300371120497 shows the head end fairly well. These hand tools would be relatively easily modified with sets of opposed jaws that can be interchanged by just removing 2 pins.
The T&B models I referred to are similar to the WT-xxx Ground Sheath Connector Tool series for T&B's GSC crimp ferrules.. WT-232 being a 3-hex crimper (measuring ~.178", .197", .230"). The more recent model I got is a WT-238 4-hex tool (numbered 101, 128, 149 and 158, but not in thousandths in.). I still need to measure the hex openings and try some standard tubing sizes in them. Between the two T&B models, they cover 7 hex sizes of the GSC crimps, and usable for various sizes of materials with different wall thicknesses. http://cgi.ebay.com/Thomas-Betts-WT-238-Crimping-Tool-9671-/220699323967 Item # 220699323967 there is a cloe-up shot of the jaws.
I just bought several tools from this seller, rssurplus-xs, and he did combine shipping into one flat-rate box USPS PM (and I didn't even have to ask) although I did request USPS.. not the-brown-united-damage-service.
BTW, these particular T&B WT crimp tools operate the moving jaw with a cam lobe of sorts on the internal end of the moving handle, which provides a considerable amount of mechanical advantage.
--
WB
.........


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    Just plastic dipped handles for comfort? :-)
    [ ... ]

http://cgi.ebay.com/B-AMP-Type-C-Crimp-45099-Terminal-Crimper-Crimpers-/300371120497
    Yes -- these appear to be related to the special crimper for coax inserts into DB-25 modifications such as the 13W3 used for older Sun monitor cables. (10 normal D series pins, and three coax pins.)
    The crimper which I have of that style (which is *not* the one which you found there) crimps at the same time a sleeve over the shield of the coax, and a pair of skinny fingers reach through holes in the sides of the pins to crimp the center conductor to a captive center pin (male or female) as needed. While I have the crimper, and connectors which use those inserts, I don't (yet) have any of the uncrimped pins for them. Well ... some of these days, perhaps. :-)
    As an example, at a recent hamfest I got a couple of plastic bags with a few thousand of the small yellow (24-28 ga) crimp terminals for a couple of AMP crimpers which I had with a few of the terminals for many years.
    Also boxes of the crimp ferrules for terminating shields and jumpering them together or to pins on connectors. (Yes, I have the crimp tools for those, too. :-)
    [ ... ]

    Yes -- I have some similar ones with different maker's names on them, including General Radio IIRC -- used for the 874 series of hermaphrodite coax connectors.
    I don't know what tooling would be used for their 900 series hermaphrodite coax connectors, but something different.

    Hmm ... I've had pretty good results with UPS overall.
    I haven't bought much via eBay since they started forcing their vendors to offer only PayPal. You have to engage in e-mail exchanges to find out whether they will accept other payment methods before you can bid -- and many will not. Back when the vendors could post that they accepted X and Y methods of payment things were nicer. (I just won't get a PayPal account. :-)

    Yes -- but it calls for frequent lube with a high film strength lubricant if you use it a lot.
    I like the compound leverage in most Amp crimpers better.
    Oh yes -- I have a small hex crimper which has handles which look like an old grade school one hole paper punch. There are two bars with the half hexes. One (most distant from the handles) is stationary, and the other is cammed by the handles to close with three or four hex sizes going down to very small ones.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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