battery terminals

Gang, I may have to make this, but I'm looking for a supplier for an oddball battery terminal/connector setup. Situation: Pickup truck, wanting to
run #2 or #4 copper stranded cable to BOTH front and back of the vehicle to operate a winch (with forklift type connectors connected on the end of the cables and a matching connector on the winch AND also want to attach a #2 or #4 cable for running a 2000w inverter which will probably be mounted inside the cab in the extended cab area. The battery is a top post type, and I am guessing I need some kind of a busbar type of arrangement (ideally with a fuse link in it or a disconnect lever for eliminating hot cables when they aren't being used. I'm assuming I can use the frame (and clean connections) for the negative. Any links or information will be helpful. Please post to the newsgroup. Thanks. Ken.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article <6b9737c610beda173af642afde9c7b37

You might try here:
http://www.waytekwire.com /
Ned Simmons
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've seen kits over the years that consist of cable, terminals and a covered box for locating battery terminals at the rear of a vehicle. They might be called remote battery/jumper terminals or something similar, a handy accessory (for a service vehicle, for example), to jump start other cars without having to pull up front end-to-front end to jump a battery.
NAPA and other dealers probably have these kits.
WB .............
<Ken Sterling> wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Back when I had a brand new '76 Ramcharger for a service vehicle I had welder cable plugs on the front fender for boosters.. Had them connected to the battery with a constant duty solenoid, switched in the cab. I ran #2 welding cable from the plugs to both pos and negative battery terminals.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(clip)with forklift type connectors connected the end of the cables (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Why not USE forklift type connectors?
Another suggestion: I have seen towtruck drivers, responding to a dead battery call, jump out and plug in their jumper cables without raising the hood. They must have must the kind of connectors you need mounted in the grille area. Why don't you try to find out what they are using?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I AM going to use forklift type connectors - at the FAR ends to connect to the winch, either front or rear mounted.... What I'm looking for is a way to attach (with a good, solid connection) three cables, #1 going to the front for the winch, #2 going to the rear for the winch and #3 going to the 2000w inverter (probably #4 or #2 stranded copper) AT THE BATTERY post (along with the original starter cable. I'm thinking of some sort of a heavy duty bussbar of sorts with setscrews used for clamping the wire into a hole of the proper size and having the bussbar mounted to the terminal of the battery. Ken.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ken Sterling wrote:

The link Ned posted was a nice site. We have a large Interstate battery distributor down the road and he has all sorts of crimp-on connectors, including pass-through types for double battery setups. The cheap and not so dirty way is to get the type with the threaded stud on the top and crimp eyelets to your accessory cables. Burndy has all sorts of exotic multi-tap crimps if you want to avoid stacking the eyelets.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That site isn't bad, but still nothing like I'm looking for. This link shows a terminal something like I need, so I know some company out there makes them. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item069460454&categoryP549 The solenoid idea from Wayne (and others) is a GOOD idea as I was thinking of somekind of a 200 amp fused switch - the solenoid wouldn't act as a fuse, but would permit quick disconnect (as long as the solenoid internal contacts didn't weld together <G>) Ken
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ken Sterling wrote:

Nice thought, I wouldn't use it. Too many high amp connections in a corrosive environment. Could lead to problems.
I'm with Wayne with this one. Get a new battery and starter cable made and run it to a buss. That way if they arc and spark there is less chance of blowing up a battery. Also makes for a neater installation.
I also like the idea of a remote battery. If you run the leads tot he bed you can also use more than one battery. NOTE: this would bring up charging and circuit issues, unless two 6 volts were used in series.
Unless your connections are going to be soldered make sure their properly crimped/ lugged.
I've done plenty of this work. That's why I've stayed out of this thread. You seem determined to stay with hooking this directly to the battery terminal which is something I would resist. Given a choice I never run anything to the battery terminal.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mark, Not *determined* to make the connection at the battery post - and Wayne's and your idea of a short cable from the battery to the solenoid with the starter cable being connected there makes sense... I guess you gotta think outta the battery box <G>.... I like the idea of doing it this way (other than the fact that the factory original cable connected to the +terminal now is really short laced into the harness (but I still think do-able). Thanks for the suggestions (which is exactly what I needed). Ken.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ken Sterling wrote:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item069460454&categoryP549
I recommend crimping the connections. You can crimp 3/8" eyelets on the conductors and then connect them on a copper busbar, then brush on Scotchkote insulation. Doing the connections away from the battery will also help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ATP wrote:

I completely agree but offer a word of warning. I was fortunate enough to pick up a selection of AMP crimping tools surplus for $10ea instead of the $200 retail price. These do a superb job compared to lesser crimping tools. An example: I spliced a #10 wire lead that I had cut in two places back together with high quality butt splices. One splice was crimpped with an AMP crimper and one was done with the common Yellow handled cutter/stripper/crimper. I then put about a ten amp current through this lead and measured the voltage drop accros each splice. The loss across the AMP crimped splice was less than half that across the other.
If you don't have and can't borrow the use of really good crimping tools, you would be better off soldering the 3/8" eyelets provided you did a good job of the soldering.
Ted
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ted Edwards wrote:

Agreed. The regular non-compound action crimpers are kind of a joke. I was lucky enough to get a large adjustable mechanical dent crimper which exerts quite a bit of pressure. My preference, however is a Burndy Y35 or equivalent, which uses cylindrical dies. I got one for $35, but I need to buy or make some dies for it. The local utility will only accept round die crimps on primary splices and elbows.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Soldered joints don't perform very well in high current applications. Most welding shops which sell cable and connectors will have a good hydraulic crimper, and will usually install the terminals for you for no extra charge. At least the welding shop where I do business will, and they've got a *monster* hydraulic crimper.
Gary
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gary Coffman wrote:

In what way? What failure modes? Before I had my AMP crimpers, I had to resort to soldered joints. First I saturated the stripped end with solder then made sure the solder flowed all through the space between wire and connector sleeve. The highest current ones I did this way were eyelet connectors to attach 00 Superflex welding cable to a 60amphour, 12volt bank of NiCds. This was tested at currents up to 500Amps and routinely used at 300Amps over a period of about ten years and at temperatures ranging from room temperature to -50C without any sign of problems or heating at the soldered joints.
While I agree that _properly_ crimped connections are better and are first choice, I think that _properly_ soldered ones are grossly under rated.
Ted
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Agreed!
    Note that these yellow-handeled cutter/stripper/crimper/screw-cutter devices can be found with "AMP"s name on them -- but these are considered field expedients, not serious crimping tools.

    This does not surprise me at all.

    Note, also, that the AMP tools don't stop at the #10 gauge sizes (yellow insulation), but extend well past that, with two sizes of hydraulically powered tools which accept interchangeable dies:
1)    Hand-held, with hydraulic pump built in:
    insul    wire size     red    #8     blue    #6     yellow    #4     red    #2
2)    Larger, with just the hydraulic slave cylinder and the     die-mounting frame:          insul    wire size     blue    0 (or 1/0)     yellow    2/0     red    3/0     blue    4/0    (wire about the size of your index finger)
1a)    There is also a stand-alone die and frame for the first range     of dies which are similar to those in (2) above. Both the (2)     and (1a) heads connect to your choice of power source:
    a)    Hand-held pump, 10,000 PSI like Enerpac makes
    b)    Foot-operated pump, similar to (a) above. This was         the first which I encountered on a set of dies for         4/0 terminals.
    c)    An electrically-powered pump which, on the press of a         button, runs up to a pre-set pressure (about 7000 PSI         IIRC), and then shuts off and automatically allows the         dies to open.
    I've gotten all three kinds of heads, a full set of the dies for the (1) series above, and three of the four dies for the (2) series -- everything but a 4/0 set. For power, I have the Enerpac hand-pump, and the electric cycling pump (which was the first part of this I got -- thanks to a surplus sale in which I was bidding on something else, and this happened to be in the lot. I only realized what it was when I was packing it up to take home with the rest of the lot. That started my collection of the AMP hydraulic crimpers. :-)
    It takes a while of watching eBay to get this far -- plus a little luck at other source, such as hamfests and surplus sales, but it is possible, and should be done before you need it, because you can't get these for anything affordable when buying new. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Aside, it's getting hard to find crimp *terminals* that aren't absolute junk, nevermind having the correct crimper. At least, the last batches of #10-12 spade and ring terminals I got from home depot and lowes were of such thin gauge that they simply were not stiff enough to stay on the wire. Whatever they were intended for, I have no idea.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

This is a good reason to use silver solder (the expensive stuff) on high current terminations. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toolbert wrote:

Doesn't surprise me. If you want good ones, find someone who deals in genuine AMP ones. Anybody who supplies them for aircraft would presumably have the good ones.
Ted
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toolbert wrote:

In the larger sizes, at least in NY, HD is selling a major, reputable brand, IIRC, it was Burndy, I just bought some last week and they were very nice.
WRT to the smaller stuff, I wish I could find more bare spade and ring terminals that could be lightly crimped and then soldered.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.