What is the purspose of pre-tinned wire?

On Fri, 17 Apr 2009 11:29:51 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@radagast.org (Dave Platt) wrote:


There are grades of plating, just like there are grades of say hard anodizing surface thickness for Aluminum, which affects its insulative capacity (electrical).
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Wrong. The customer gets what the customer buys. If all YOU were exposed to was SPC TFE, the THAT was ALL your employer was buying, you dope. TPC was just as prevalent, despite the fact that it sucks on so many levels.
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Beats me?
Steve Terry
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wrote:

That's why one should use SPC, which is Silver plated Copper.
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Sandi wrote:

Are you certain that its tinned wire you are looking at and not nickel-plated copper? That is often used for high temp applications where the copper alone will oxidize.
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In the telecom industry the rule is "silver on silver". Back in the bad old days there could be problems with diss-simmilar metals corroding & creating noise on circuits both from rectification effects & from current punch-through across the junction when voltage was applied to the circuit, i.e. "going off-hook". In some cases "sealing" current was (& still is) applied on a constant basis to circuits that didn't require it for operation, just to keep junction corrosion from getting bothersome.
Although not part of the original Bellcore standard I've actually speced tinned wire for T1 circuits going into areas I knew were going going to be climate controlled.
H.
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On Fri, 17 Apr 2009 22:54:38 GMT, Howard Eisenhauer
: :>Some insulated multistrnd copper wire is pre-tinned and a lot is :>not. :> :>What is the purpose of pre-tinned wire? As far as I can see the :>advantage is that the copper core doesn't oxidise which means the :>wire can be soldered or fixed to a terminate with only minimal :>cleaning. :> :>Sounds like a good thing to me, so why isn't almost all wire pre- :>tinned? :> :>Is cost really so different? :> :>Does the tinning-coating replace where copper would have been in :>the overall wire and tinning is of higher reistence? :> :>Is flexibility affected? : : :In the telecom industry the rule is "silver on silver". Back in the :bad old days there could be problems with diss-simmilar metals :corroding & creating noise on circuits both from rectification effects :& from current punch-through across the junction when voltage was :applied to the circuit, i.e. "going off-hook". In some cases :"sealing" current was (& still is) applied on a constant basis to :circuits that didn't require it for operation, just to keep junction :corrosion from getting bothersome. : :Although not part of the original Bellcore standard I've actually :speced tinned wire for T1 circuits going into areas I knew were going :going to be climate controlled. : :H.
That is correct. A typical manufacturer of internal switchboard cable application chart shows that their Switchboard 100 product (equivalent to what most western countries would use for internal cabling) is suitable for T1 and DS1 applications. http://www.superioressex.com/uploadedFiles/Communications_Cable/Technical_Information/tn33_centoffice_select_chart.pdf
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Ooops- typo, I meant to say I spec'd tinned wire for areas I knew were *not* to be climate controlled.
More specificly DSX panels mounted outside in un-heated, not particularly weatherproof, cabinets.
H.
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Sandi wrote:

I guess they assume you do not need to cut it to length. It probably solders easier or stay in a pinch connector better.
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One of the unmentioned uses is in kits. Tinned wire reduces the chance of a bad connection made by someone inexperienced in soldering. (I didn't say it eliminated the chance.)
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