How to fill pitted aluminum for powder coating?

Is there a good way to fill pits (up to .150" diameter) in an aluminum
casting (a motorcycle chaincase) so that it can be powder coated? The
powder coating process subjects the part to 400 degrees F., so I think
plastic fillers would not stand up.
I imagine gas welding would do it, but I don't know that I could do it.
Reply to
Joe Landau
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Welding on the cover wouldn't be smart. You'd likely distort it to the point of being useless. Can't offer a better suggestion, but I'd vote welding out.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
Powder coating relies on the part being conductive to electrostatically attract the powder prior to baking - the powder may not stick to the surface where there are filled holes. Just a guess - I'm not an expert in this - someone else may know for sure. Are you using a different power coating method??
rob
Reply to
Rob
Static electricity will stick the power on anything. I'd say bondo or such - but how does that react with heat ? - I guess well since the hoods and fenders of cars get rather hot.
But how about power coat melt hot ?
Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member
Rob wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
| Is there a good way to fill pits (up to .150" diameter) in an aluminum | casting (a motorcycle chaincase) so that it can be powder coated? The | powder coating process subjects the part to 400 degrees F., so I think | plastic fillers would not stand up. | | I imagine gas welding would do it, but I don't know that I could do it.
Why not that aluminum brazing filler rod? Conductive too.
Reply to
carl mciver
Joe Landau wrote in news:Xns9797E78696FE6jrlversaformcom@199.45.49.11:
I think I'll try the aluminum brazing (or maybe it's soldering) rod first. A number of people on the net have reported success. Thanks.
Joe
Reply to
Joe Landau
No, it wasn't, as a matter of fact. It was the opportunity to try a new process.
Another time I'd use the lab metal, as it's hard to get the brazing metal to build adequately. But I don't think the effort was wasted.
Joe
wrote in news:yGLXf.50017$ snipped-for-privacy@newsfe7-gui.ntli.net:
Reply to
Joe Landau

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