How to Run a Lathe download

Does anybody know where South Bend's "How to Run a Lathe" can be
downloaded? There are lots of people selling CD/DVD copies on
Ebay, but I hate to pay someone for intellectual property they
don't own themselves.
Reply to
Mike Berger
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So you would rather steal it?
Sheesh.
It's for sale at tons of places. It's so totally worth it, it isn't funny. I've read dozens of books on running a manual lathe and nothing comes close.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Are you really that cheap? What's wrong with an original?
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Reply to
Tom
For less than ten bucks (including shipping) you will get a book that is WELL worth the money.
Reply to
Rastus
Steal it from whom? I believe the copyright has expired.
Do you think it's preferable that I BUY it from someone that has downloaded it for free?
Grant Erw>
Reply to
Mike Berger
Why would you accuse me of being cheap? It would cost a lot of money to convert that to a computer file and animate it into the movie that I'm looking for.
Tom wrote:
Reply to
Mike Berger
Thanks, but I didn't ask about the book. I was asking about the movie.
Rastus wrote:
Reply to
Mike Berger
There is a goverment training tape out on the web, not as good as the book you are looking for but its free, well not realy free I'm sure it cost us tax payers something. Its a pdf not a video.
Reply to
wayne mak
Movie? When did you mention a movie?
Reply to
Tom
Let's just end the pissing contest:
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Reply to
Jim Stewart
That's what's on the DVD according to the Ebay descriptions. I already knew about the book, which is on paper.
Tom wrote:
Reply to
Mike Berger
Hardly an answer..
Reply to
Tom
Lindsay Books has it. By the time you print it off, paper, ink cartridges, etc. cheaper to buy the hard copy. I've delt with them for many years and all their books are first rate, although some can be a little strange.
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Uncle George ==============================
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
Last one I bought (56th edition) cost me twenty five cents one Saturday morning a couple years ago. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
I don't think South Bend ever intended to make any money off of "How to Run a Lathe". They sent me a copy for free when I called to get some details about my 10K.
BTW that was an amazing call. The little old lady that answered the phone pulled the card on my 30 year old lathe and told me everything except what the assembler had for lunch that day.
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
Coincidence - my copy of "How to run a lathe" turned up in the mail this morning. 1942 edition. A reprint by Lindsey Books. Cost me $20, including postage. Worth every cent. Was recommended to me by someone on this group - thanks for that.
I also downloaded some of the SouthBend stuff from Ed Williams site - interesting, but , probably due to my age, I MUCH prefer a nice paper copy of textbooks/manuals - easier to annotate, and certainly easier to keep on the bench next to you.
So, by all means go electronic if you like - BUT most of the reference books and manuals I use in my daily work as an electronics technician (and beginning machinist) are paper. And in cases like this where the book is cheap, why bother downloading and printing it out?
Andrew VK3BFA.
PS - the 1917 edition had some great projects, pity you cant get the castings they were selling for the same price......
Reply to
Andrew VK3BFA
Thanks! This is a great resource!
Jim Stewart wrote:
Reply to
Mike Berger
Yes, I have a bunch of their publications. All with expired copyrights, of course. Some things are handy to have in machine readable form though.
F. George McDuffee wrote:
Reply to
Mike Berger
I don't disagree -- but it's nice to review books before deciding whether or not they're worthwhile to buy if a hard copy is useful. What makes anybody think I was planning to print it out?
Andrew VK3BFA wrote:
Reply to
Mike Berger
Thanks especially to Jim Stewart for pointing me to some excellent free and legal resources for downloading.
I'm really surprised at all the mean-spirited responses I received.
* There is nothing wrong with downloading legal, non-copyrighted material from the Internet, EVEN if old hard copies exist. That's not being "cheap". It's practical and useful.
*
Downloading material that is not governed by copyright is legal. It's not stealing.
I own an Internet Service Provider. We are *very* consciencious about enforcing copyright violations. For people to insinuate that I was trying to steal is mean spirited and ignorant. I also have lots of bandwidth (and low cost printing if I want it) available. So YOU might think an old beat up hard copy is better. But that might not be true for me.
I hope some of the people who responded in such a negative way will think more before posting in the future. If you want to be our moral guardians and the cops of the world, get your facts right first.
Reply to
Mike Berger

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