How to tin copper wire question

I am looking to tin 12ga solid copper wire that has been slightly formed. The parts are about 4" long . What is the proper type solder
and flux to use and the best heat source. Or could anybody lead me to a how to website?
Thanks Dennis
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snipped-for-privacy@tm.net wrote:

You might think about doing it chemically. RadicalShrug should have what you need in their PCB-department.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@tm.net wrote:

I would probably clean wire with 600 grit sandpaper. And if I did not need the whole wire tinned, use a small propane torch to heat where I do not need it tinned. Apply whatever solder you want. If it does not tin nicely, poke the end of the solder in some paste flux and try again.
If you need the whole wire tinned, you can tin one end and then use the torch on the tinned end while you tin the rest.
A great big solder iron or a solder pot would be better, but I assume you don't have those.
Dan
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wrote:

Dan thanks for the quick response. I only need each end tinned. I have a small iron and I use a propane torch. The trick is getting the proper amount of heat. I will purchase a soldering pot if I knew this would work.
Would I be able to just sort of dip the ends in the pot or do I have to apply heat and flux first. I will be making these parts by the 1000's if my product sells.
Thanks Dan Dennis
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For high volume you definitely want to look into a soldering pot. ___________________________ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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On Fri, 24 Nov 2006 17:19:19 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@tm.net wrote:

OK, that changes things. Get/make a solder pot. Dip clean the ends first, then dip in the pot.There is a kind of "oil" that can be put on top of the molten solder to keep oxygen out so it doesn't "dross" Actually, I think it is actually Borax. You put in borax powder and it melts, putting a film on the solder. Tinning fluid for electrical apps is rosin and alchohol mix. Dip the part untill it is well coated (it needs to heat up) then wipe the finished product on a damp rag or natural sponge.
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snipped-for-privacy@tm.net wrote:

If you end up wanting to use a solder pot then take a look at:
http://www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog/browse.cgi?1164395396.3476=/html/catalog/melters.html
The target buyer is a bullet caster but it should work fine for you. Sprinkling boric acid on top of the alloy would be a good idea also to keep oxidation from attacking your solder.
Wes S
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snipped-for-privacy@tm.net wrote:

With the solder pot, you will have a small pot of molten solder. You should be able to dip the end in some cleaner and then into the pot. The copper will warm up very quickly so it should only take a couple of seconds to tin an end.
I just googled on solder pots and was amazed at the prices. Look in the W.W. Grainger catalog for cartridge heaters. You ought to be able to make your own with a cartridge heater and a light dimmer switch for not too much.
Dan
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You would dip into flux - it is a paste pot or brush it on - get a pot...
Then dip into the solder pot - the flux vaporizes, tins and then the solder attaches to the copper nicely.
What are the wires for - you will have to clean the resultant flux off.
Two types - water base (almost required now) and resin based.
If you are doing a lot of this or many at a one time only - a pot would be useful.
Otherwise a 150 watt Black Beauty iron would do the job. Perhaps a 200 Watt.
Propane requires a soldering tip. It is useful, but might overheat and melt insulation that you don't want heated.
Insulation protection is another item - professionals use anti-skating clamps that are simply a conducting metal that has handles and a hole through a large heat sink blank. It absorbs the heat and wicks it away from the insulation. A home made brass blank (remember brass solders so keep it off) See technique
Ok - an iron or a anti-skating. Technique:
heat iron or the item you want to keep solder from adhering to. Then using the inside of the heel - the curved part under the instep - move the surface of the metal all around and thus get the rubber to melt/adher.
A Pink Pearl is useful. I was taught to use the boot heel where it didn't show. This will turn the area dark and the solder will roll off.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member http://lufkinced.com /
snipped-for-privacy@tm.net wrote:

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wrote:

Not electrical I assume? Get some tinning fluid. IIRC it is hydrochloric acid cut with zinc. Dip the parts, heat and apply solder. If electrical, use rosin core solder after cleaning the part thoroughly. (if you use acid to clean, neutralize, rinse, and dry before soldering).
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On Fri, 24 Nov 2006 16:58:14 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@tm.net wrote:

Green label flux
http://www.ogauge.co.uk/carrs.html
Tutorial here is one of the best
http://www.dccconcepts.com.au/pdf/soldersandsolderingfactsheet.pdf
I did a soldering course with Richard J and can confidently solder stainless steel using the right ( extremely nasty stuff ) flux
HTH Alan, in Gosnells, Western Oz. VK6 YAB VKS 737 - W 6174
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