JD tie rod end taper?

Wallowed out tie rod end hole on a steering
knuckle on a 4WD John Deere tractor. $1800
part. Got a new tie rod, trying to figure out
the taper so I can get a reamer. It's a ZF
front
axle, so it's probably metric. Does anybody
KNOW what the taper is? Looks really close
to 1 in 12, but is it?
Source for a left hand spiral right hand reamer?
Thanks,
Bill
Reply to
BillM
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Had the same problem on an old Deere backhoe, though it was a $165 part. I put the knuckle on the mill and bored out the worn out section with a 1" end mill. Put some 1.25" bar in the lathe and turned to match the 1". Drilled and bored the matching taper into the bar (don't recall what it was). Cut the insert to length, pressed it into the knuckle, welded both ends, ground flush and it worked good as new.
Reply to
Pete C.
Thanks Pete---If it was a one time thing that's what I would do too. The outfit I work for has a half dozen of these mechanical front drive tractors. At 2 per tractor, and as big a pain in the ass as it is to get the knuckle off (drop the wheel/tire and then a planetary gearbox), I figure that a reamer will pay for itself quickly. Weld it up, grind/drill it close, ream to finish---all on the tractor. Sure wish you could recall what that taper was! I've measured it three times, and it comes out at just barely over 1" in 12". That's on the male tie rod end. Do they do a crush lock on those? Is the hole a true 1:12? The Metric tapers I find reference to on tie rod ends are 1:10, and it's not that.
Bill
Reply to
BillM
Sounds like a fun job.
Unlikely it was the same on an old 500C backhoe.
I don't know what ou have for a shop, perhaps take a sample to a local machine shop that may be able to measure more precisely?
Reply to
Pete C.
You might either make a casting around the male taper or turn a matching female taper on the lathe. You can then then measure the taper as accurately as it really is by measuring the depth of two different size balls in the hole. Ideally the large ball should go just over halfway into the large end of the taper and the small one should stick out of the small end slightly less than halfway, but it is not critical.
Don Young
Reply to
Don Young
Measured the large and small end with a 0-1 mike. Length with a vernier caliper. Comes out at 1.0603" per foot. That's an average of 3 readings, but none of then varied by more than a few thousandths.
If I set the new tie rod end up on the mill table, dial it concentric (vertical), put a dial indicator in the quill setting horizontal on the centerline I should be able to get a very accurate read on the taper by computing the dial indicator against the quill DRO.
I guess I'm just trying to be a little lazy, hoping that somewhere in the near infinite knowledge of the group there was someone that had "been there, done that", and I would have the answer-- complete with the supplier and part number for the reamer. Oh well, guess I'll have to do my own homework. :-)
Bill
Reply to
BillM
Bill, I have been told there are industry standards that everybody adheres to, but I personally cannot confirm that. What I do know is there appears to be two stardards used in the the States. They are 1.5" per foot which are used on most tie rods and shock mounts and the 2" per foot standard. Both reamers are available from
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part# R8201 (1.5") and R8202 (2"). They are around $100 each. Visit their web site and buy on-line. I have both and the quality is OK. Steve
Reply to
Steve Lusardi
5º IIRC, been a while, but used to be a good little earner resurrecting JD frontends.
I don't like your chances of remedying oval holes in situ with a reamer. Boring and sleeving was the norm.
Tom
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Reply to
Tom
The man has a German made component, DIN standards prevail there.
Tom
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Reply to
Tom
"Steve Lusardi" wrote in message news:g32l7l$q14$02$ snipped-for-privacy@news.t-online.com...
Yup---I've used both of them at one time or another. Also called 7 degree and 8 degree IIRC. There is also a 1.2" per foot (1:10) reamer out there that I've found reference to. It appears to be the taper for Toyota?
The JD tractor steering doesn't appear to be any of the above. It's close to a 1:12, but not quite. The front steering axle is a ZF. Everything below the mount appears to be metric. What started out as a couple of mouse clicks to order a reamer is getting interesting.
Bill
Reply to
BillM
=========== Engineers love standards -- that's why there are so many of them.....
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
And if you are high enough in the pecking order you can start your own. Likely because reading Machinerys Handbook isn't on their reading list.
Wes
Reply to
Wes

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