morse taper

I'm progressing slowly in Gingery's book, The Metal Shaper (#3 in the
Build Your Own Metal Shop From Scrap series, in I'm reading all the books
in order). He says on p.14, as he did in the earlier volume on The Metal
Lathe, that you can get a #1 Morse taper from the Sears tool catalogue.
I ordered the Sears tool catalogue (Craftsman Power and Hand Tools 2004-2005)
and am unable to find any mention of a #1 Morse taper. So maybe things have
changed since he wrote the book.
Which catalogue should I be looking in?
Let me emphasize that I don't actually *need* a #1 Morse taper right now.
At this stage, I'm just reading the books and trying to visualize everything
in them and check certain details. I'm not building anything and don't have
any kind of shop yet.
Ignorantly,
Allan Adler
snipped-for-privacy@zurich.ai.mit.edu
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Reply to
Allan Adler
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Allan Adler snipped-for-privacy@nestle.csail.mit.edu
I don't know what's in their catalog, but you probably have to refer to a tool name to find out.The term #1 Morse taper refers only to that particular form of self-holding shank or corresponding bore, and not to the particular tool or holder it happens to be found with--such as a dead or live center, or drill, reamer, end mill, or such. Frank Morrison
Reply to
Fdmorrison
As someone else said, the morse taper is just the "mounting" or shank portion of the tool. Here are a few examples of tools/holders/etc. that use a #1 Morse taper:
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Best Regards, Keith Marshall snipped-for-privacy@progressivelogic.com
"Even if you are on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." - Will Rogers (1879-1935).
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Reply to
Keith Marshall
Thanks. I now see that they are on p.152 of the Tool Catalogue. If I had searched for "morse taper" at the Sears website, I might have found these items but I think I wouldn't have realized that they were also in the catalogue.
Ignorantly, Allan Adler snipped-for-privacy@zurich.ai.mit.edu
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Reply to
Allan Adler
Not in the Sears one. Don't purchase machine tooling from them, it will be a waste of your time. Catalogs have a wealth of information in them so you should have a copy of the McMaster Carr catalog and the MSC one as well, for spicy reading.
Both of those will go a long way to explaining what kinds of tooling are available to do various jobs.
Jim
================================================== please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ==================================================
Reply to
jim rozen
A #1 Morse taper WHAT? Arbor? Drill bit? Center? Reamer? All of these and other tools besides have, or can be supplied with, Morse taper shanks. I can't figure out how a #1 Morse taper anything would go onto a shaper, the taper is used for holding tools against rotation, like in a drill press, mill or lathe.
Sears has changed what they supply considerably in the last decade, they used to catalog a lot of stuff of interest to the home machining crowd, it's mostly gone. There's some stuff that fits the wood lathes they used to have, that's about it. Supply and demand, demand must be down for the stuff, at least from Sears, so now is supply.
On the other hand, industrial supply outfits are more willing to do business on a onesie-twosie basis than they were in the past. One outfit that I've used a lot is MSC, they've got an oulet here in town, but
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gets you into their search engine, the catalog is online, you can get a searchable CD for free, too. There are others, I'm sure they'll get mentioned.
Stan
Reply to
Stan Schaefer
I just took another look at what Gingery writes in The Metal Shaper, p.14: "You can order a 1/2" hand tighten chuck with a #1 Morse taper shank from Sears tool catalog."
I think I need to spend more time using my dictionary when I read Gingery's books. The word "shank", for example, was not in my vocabulary and I just tuned it out, thinking that the main term was probably "Morse taper", which I didn't realize was purely descriptive. In my dictionary, I find among the many meanings of "shank": "the part, usually straight or stemlike, between the top or handle and the working part; shaft: said of instruments or tools." Well, I guess that that is sufficiently imprecise that it might not have helped me in this case.
Ignorantly, Allan Adler snipped-for-privacy@zurich.ai.mit.edu
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Reply to
Allan Adler

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