FOLLOWUP on Morse 5 taper cleanup

Just won this on ebay:
Lavallee and Ide Inc. Morse Taper Reamer 350135360725
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This is supposed to be a Morse 5 taper reamer. Price was $36.
Reply to
Ignoramus16911
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Says minor scuffs and scratches. Wonder if they are on the reamer or on the box? If you get it, be sure to carefully examine the flutes to see it there are scuffs and scratches. If so, stone them out, if possible. Else they will duplicate themselves in your Morse #5.
Paul
Reply to
co_farmer
Nice price for one in the condition this one appears to have.
It is not a feather. :-)
Good luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
I am optimistic, if it is in original packaging. We'll see. I will indeed examine it closely.
Reply to
Ignoramus16911
Very good price. You should collect a full set from 07 to MT 6. They can be life saving. They are also useful for setting up taper attachments on lathes. All my lathes have taper attachments. Steve
Reply to
Steve Lusardi
I will start with looking for MT3 and MT2 tapers. (tailstock and drill press)
i
Reply to
Ignoramus4508
I've got a set from MT-1 through MT-5 in a fitted wooden box, plus a MT-0 which I already had added in where there was room.
I've used the MT-2 to clean the taper in my drill press spindle (which was spitting out tools too readily), and the MT-3 in the lathe's tailstock (for similar reasons). I've also used the MT-2 and MT3 for making adaptors from the MT-4-1/2 in my lathe's spindle.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Don, how do you turn it inside the lathe spindle?
Reply to
Ignoramus4508
I've got a taper attachment to get close to the desired taper, and then finish it with the MT finish reamer held in the reamer holder in the bed turret.
Of course -- I first turned the OD taper to match the MT-4-1/2, then turned a bit of a small step on each end to minimize the chance of burrs or dings making it offsized or off-center, then drilled, turned the ID and reamed.
Or do you mean "How do I turn the taper reamer to clean the inner taper of the spindle?" For *that* I set up for the slowest speed, mount the reamer in a large tap holder, use the center in the tailstock to hold the outer end on center, and lightly press the reamer into the slowly turning (35 RPM) spindle. It *has* to be a light pressure or it will grab the tap wrench from your hands and slam it into the bed rails. It would be a good idea to put a piece of wood over the bed to protect it if this happens. But you don't want to remove a lot of metal -- just a tiny amount from high spots.
Hmm ... come to think of it -- I could *not* have done the ID of the spindle, since I don't have a MT 4-1/2 reamer. I just did the ID of the adaptors inside the spindle.
As for in the tailstock, I held it in place by the heel of my hand, and used an open-end wrench to turn it a little. Ease off the hand pressure before you stop turning so you don't leave burrs in the ID.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
"DoN. Nichols" wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@Katana.d-and-d.com:
As far as I know the MT 4-1/2 on my lathe is the same taper as an MT5. I purchased a hardened and ground MT 5-3 sleeve to make an adaptor with the intent of reducing the OD to match my lathe. The small end goes in and fits nicely into the headsock. Gauge line dimensions seem to be the only difference so a MT 5 reamer should nicely clean a MT 4-1/2 spindle if necessary.
Reply to
Charles U Farley
Don,
I thought that in general lathe spindles were hardened and ground, my Harrison M300 is, so is it a good idea to use a reamer to clean the taper?, I might have thought it would tend to damage the reamer cutting edges.
Reply to
David Billington
I think you have a close fit not a fit.
LARGE SMALL MORSE DIAMETER DIAMETER TAPER# (A) (B) LENGTH --------------------------------------- 0 .35610" .25200 1-15/16 1 .47500 .36900 2-1/16 2 .70000 .57200 2-1/2 3 .93800 .77800 3-1/16 4 1.23100 1.02000 3-7/8 4-1/2 1.50000 1.26600 4-5/16 5 1.74800 1.47500 4-15/16 6 2.49400 2.11600 7 7 3.27000 2.75000 9-1/2 ---------------------------------------
Martin
Charles U Farley wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Why don't you use plastic reamers made for that purpose. They won't cut anything but grime and grit.
Martin
David Bill>> >>
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
_Machinery's Handbook_ -- 25th edition, page 910:
(Table 5, "American National Standard Self-Holding Tapers")
No. of Taper Taper per Foot 4 0.62326 4-1/2 0.62400 5 0.63131
(This table is the only place where I have found MT-4-1/2 spec'd. I think that when ANSI grabbed the Brown & Sharpe, the Morse, and the '3/4" per foot taper series' (I think Jarno taper) to make an ANSI standard covering a wide range, they added the 4-1/2 to fill what they considered to be too large a gap in the series. That is why it and the MT-7 are the only Morse tapers to have only zeros after the third decimal place. :-)
The difference between the MT 5 and the MT 4-1/2 should be 0.00731 inch/foot. Whether this is small enough to be no problem probably depends on your application -- and perhaps on how accurately the MT 5 taper was made.
I would not use a MT 5 reamer in my MT 4-1/2 spindle.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
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I think that this depends on the maker -- and perhaps the model as well. I know that the spindle which I have on my 12x24" Clausing shows signs of not being hardened and ground where the bull gear engages the spindle. It *might* have been case hardened in certain areas and ground. But I think that hardening the whole length of the spindle risks it warping.
A reamer used with very light force should do a good job of scraping off junk without harming the reamer or the spindle, assuming the taper is hardened and ground.
I do know that the ram on the tailstock is not hardened anywhere along its length.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols

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