Kitchen electric knife sharpener

I sharpen my knives by hand but many people have asked me about getting
an electric knife sharpener, especially as a Christmas gift for someone.
I have no experience, any suggestions? A lot of the foodie people
have descent cutlery but can only touch them up a bit. People ask about
sharpening serrated blades too. The only way I know is the hard way.
'Tis the season!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
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The only faster way to ruin a good knife is to use a bench grinder . Buy 'em a set of the diamond hone "stones" (actually a piece of coated sheet metal bonded to a piece of PE) and an instructional video .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Chef's choice
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makes some pretty good sharpeners, thoug h I have abandoned mine for a 1x30 belt sander with 220 grit and leather (c harged white compound) belts. I do have belts going up to something over 10 00 grit, but for the extra work, it just doesn't make enough difference in the kitchen.
Reply to
rangerssuck
"Terry Coombs" on Tue, 17 Nov 2015 12:18:31 -0600 typed >> I sharpen my knives by hand but many people have asked me about
Pretty much. Even the electric sharpeners - not such a good idea. Best bet is a set of old fashioned Arkansas stones, and you then touch them up with either a steel, or a ceramic rod (bottom of a coffee cup works too). The Tungsten Carbide sharpeners are better than the electric ones.
cheers
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Most of the electric ones have one big problem: they grind a hollow from the heel of the knife out toward the belly. If the knife has a bolster or a ricasso (many kitchen knives do), it gets worse.
Knives I inherited from my mother have that hollow. On a chopper, it makes the knife completely useless. I use bench stones on my own knives to avoid it.
Good luck. If you find a good electric sharpener that doesn't grind that hollow, let us know.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
I once tried to teach my brother how to sharpen a knife from butter knife to scalpel. He didn't have the patience or the "feel". you'd be surprised that people just buy new knives when they can't cut stuff anymore. A parade of cheap knives rather than a few good ones well cared for. I wonder why I have to carve everything when I'm a guest...I know to bring my knives! Probably the only reason I get invited anywhere for holidays.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
That may not do the trick either. I'm good with tools but never ever had luck with any of those Lansky type sharpeners, even with the jigs, ever. Got sharpening books and stuff like that and still, no dice.
Did have good luck with a Tormek system, been using that ever since. I think the leather stroping wheel is the key to that machine and why it works so well. You don't have to worry about is there a burr and how to break it off at the right time and all that jazz.
Unless the person is really excited about wasting hours sharpening a knife they care about, it just doesn't sound like stones or a special kit is great gift. I just collect dull knives from friends and sharpen then all at once a year or so. It's easiest for everybody.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
I sharpen my knives by hand but many people have asked me about getting an electric knife sharpener, especially as a Christmas gift for someone. I have no experience, any suggestions? A lot of the foodie people have descent cutlery but can only touch them up a bit. People ask about sharpening serrated blades too. The only way I know is the hard way. 'Tis the season!
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My favorite cooking shows, America's Test Kitchen and Cook's Country (same crew), did a review of knife sharpeners a few months ago. Watch the video at:
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They have always preferred a sharper "Japanese" 15 degree angle per side, vs. a blunter "European" 20 or 22 degrees, and say that in the last few years basically everyone has come around to the 15 degree angle. Their favorite 15 degree electric sharpener is the Chef's Choice Trizor XV, about $150, with an equivalent 20 degree model also available and another Chef's Choice model a best value buy at $80. Both use diamond hones and have very good guides to keep the blade in position, resulting in a very smooth uniform edge. I've never used either but they do a really good job in their tests so I think these are at least worth a look. I don't know if they address the other poster's complaint of curving near the bolster on knives with a bolster, but I kind of doubt it from watching the blade go through the sharpener in the video. Their favorite chef's knife is the Victorinox Fibrox (mentioned in the video if I misspelled that). It has won all of their tests of knives up to $150 or more for many years now and is only about $30. It does not have a bolster limiting sharpener access to the handle end of the cutting edge, so no issues with it not staying straight.
----- Regards, Carl Ijames
Reply to
Carl Ijames
============== FWIW
Victorinox Fibrox is indeed a very high quality knife for use.
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I have found that the knives and other utensils available through the restaurant supply stores tend to be much better value, and the NSF grades seem to be equal to the high prices show pieces, except for possibly a skilled sushi chef. Shipping is the drawback as these are commercial sites and it is unlikely the typical homeowner will meet the free shipping minimum. I've dealt with these firms with complete satisfaction.
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For food prep I am very satisfied with the basic Dexter, Mercer and Mundial knives, which hold very good edges and can be easily resharpened. For example
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The shorter 6 and 8 inch blades are generally better for home use.
For sharpening I have had good luck with the Lansky system. Although the basic kit works well, you will most likely want to get the finer stones to get the best possible edge.
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The guide rods are soft easily bent steel wire but are serviceable. You can re contour existing 22 degree blades to 15 degree without much problem, and it is possible to have a 22 degree edge near the handle, with a 15 degree edge toward the tip. The Lansky kit will resharpen scalloped edge blades [special stone included in many of their kits], but it is a royal pain and very time consuming.
A 10X loupe and black or blue magic marker are a big help in getting the perfect edge.
A ton of how-to videos for the Lansky kit with hints and tips on You-Tube. Sample
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Reply to
F. George McDuffee
Their
Before running off and spending $150 , think about who uses a knife sharpe ner and their habits. I picked up a Chef's Choice sharpener. It was at a tag sale or thrift store. I do not remember which. Anyway it is unused on a shelf in the garage, and the cheap Harbor Freight sharpener with crossed ceramic rods lives in a kitchen drawer. Because it is quicker to sharpen a knife with the simple non electric sharpener than it is to get the electr ic sharpener out and plug it in.
The electric sharpener would be good for sharpening a bunch of knives, but my wife only sharpens one knife at a time.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Their
Before running off and spending $150 , think about who uses a knife sharpener and their habits. I picked up a Chef's Choice sharpener. It was at a tag sale or thrift store. I do not remember which. Anyway it is unused on a shelf in the garage, and the cheap Harbor Freight sharpener with crossed ceramic rods lives in a kitchen drawer. Because it is quicker to sharpen a knife with the simple non electric sharpener than it is to get the electric sharpener out and plug it in.
The electric sharpener would be good for sharpening a bunch of knives, but my wife only sharpens one knife at a time.
Dan
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My contribution to family holiday dinners is to sharpen the knives. A fine-cut file is enough to quickly reshape the edge on most of them. Only the blades that can't be filed get ~15 degree stoning, I sharpen the softer filed ones like a hatchet.
The sound pitch is slightly different when the stone is cutting the edge versus smoothing the rounded bevel further back.
-jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins

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