lathe chuck scroll lube?

The Net abounds with answers to what to use, all different, ranging from way
oil to antiseize to powdered graphite. Dry molybdenum disulfide in some
expensive form seems to be a preferred answer for the scroll which is
exposed to chips.
I ordered the 6-jaw after reading many positive reviews of Sanou chucks. The
general opinion appears to be that they are precisely machined but the
manual ops of deburring and cleaning them may not have been as careful. Pix
of opened chucks suggested that they aren't tricky to strip and reassemble,
as long as every part goes back where it came from.
How do you maintain your lathe chucks?
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
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It may depend on the chuck. LeBlonde suggests starting with the manual that came with your chuck. Then they go on to write more on the subject.
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I'd probably be more inclined to consider LeBlonde to be an authoritative source than a lot of other sources.
"After reassembling the chuck and attaching to your manual, engine lathe like the RKL Series that LeBlond sells, stand to the side of the machine to avoid getting drenched by the oil when the lathe gets up to speed."
Reply to
Bob La Londe
I believe either Bison or Buck or maybe both make a lube for their chucks . Jim I have been very happy with my Sanou chuck for many years now . Just make sure the jaws & slots are numbered before dissembling . I made that mistake with my first chuck many years back . It took a lot longer to put back together than it took to take apart . Kicked myself in the ass a couple of times for that one . good luck animal
Reply to
Laura Allen
I believe either Bison or Buck or maybe both make a lube for their chucks . Jim I have been very happy with my Sanou chuck for many years now . Just make sure the jaws & slots are numbered before dissembling . I made that mistake with my first chuck many years back . It took a lot longer to put back together than it took to take apart . Kicked myself in the ass a couple of times for that one . good luck animal
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I used to rebuild motorcycles so I have muffin trays to keep track of parts that shouldn't be marked, like engine valves, and a set of dollar store nail polish in the electronic color codes for numbering and marking polarity. A red '+' on a black battery case shows up much better on a white background. It's fun to see the clerk's reaction when I ask for help with the nail polish, they are very helpful after getting over their initial negativity.
I have number punches for soft or thin metal, a broken tap reground to a punch for dotting steel, to avoid damaging my good center and number punches, and a Dremel cutoff wheel to mark hard steel with Roman numerals which consist of straight lines up to C. The acid pen I tried expands into a blur.
The real question is if anyone can recommend from experience an effective and readily available lubricant that doesn't hold dust or chips, possibly a bicycle chain lube or the Liquid Wrench dry lube that the LeBlond video suggests. Someone suggested putting a cardboard box over the chuck before spinning it at max speed to expel the grease or oil. I'd retract the jaws into the chuck body first to avoid a dramatic display of confetti.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
<snip>
I've used Chain Wax similar to:
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on my bicycle. Heat container in double boiler and let chain sit in melted wax for several minutes. Lift out and let solidify. Good for 500 miles or so. It's not really messy to handle and is really sweat for the first couple hundred miles riding.
Now how to apply it to your chuck if you wanted to try some is another story ;-) Close tolerances in fittings maybe an issue...
Dri-Slide is still around too:
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Reply to
Leon Fisk
FYI: My six jaw has a ball oil port right on the face.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
FYI: My six jaw has a ball oil port right on the face.
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I saw pictures of chucks like that, but no agreement on what type or weight of oil to use. Since mine is a leather belt driven lathe with HSS tools it doesn't usually spin very fast with the larger chucks. I have small chucks and collets for small close-in work and a smaller, faster lathe for deep drilling and polishing.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
> > > The Net abounds with answers to what to use, all different, ranging from > > way oil to antiseize to powdered graphite. Dry molybdenum disulfide in > > some expensive form seems to be a preferred answer for the scroll which is > > exposed to chips. > > > > I ordered the 6-jaw after reading many positive reviews of Sanou chucks. > > The general opinion appears to be that they are precisely machined but the > > manual ops of deburring and cleaning them may not have been as careful. > > Pix of opened chucks suggested that they aren't tricky to strip and > > reassemble, as long as every part goes back where it came from. > > > > How do you maintain your lathe chucks? > > > FYI: My six jaw has a ball oil port right on the face. > ---------------- > > I saw pictures of chucks like that, but no agreement on what type or weight > of oil to use. Since mine is a leather belt driven lathe with HSS tools it > doesn't usually spin very fast with the larger chucks. I have small chucks > and collets for small close-in work and a smaller, faster lathe for deep > drilling and polishing.
Reply to
Laura Allen
> > > > > The Net abounds with answers to what to use, all different, ranging from > > > way oil to antiseize to powdered graphite. Dry molybdenum disulfide in > > > some expensive form seems to be a preferred answer for the scroll which is > > > exposed to chips. > > > > > > I ordered the 6-jaw after reading many positive reviews of Sanou chucks. > > > The general opinion appears to be that they are precisely machined but the > > > manual ops of deburring and cleaning them may not have been as careful. > > > Pix of opened chucks suggested that they aren't tricky to strip and > > > reassemble, as long as every part goes back where it came from. > > > > > > How do you maintain your lathe chucks? > > > > > > FYI: My six jaw has a ball oil port right on the face. > > ---------------- > > > > I saw pictures of chucks like that, but no agreement on what type or weight > > of oil to use. Since mine is a leather belt driven lathe with HSS tools it > > doesn't usually spin very fast with the larger chucks. I have small chucks > > and collets for small close-in work and a smaller, faster lathe for deep > > drilling and polishing.
Reply to
Laura Allen
Amazon has some
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has theirs
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google came up with a few . animal
Reply to
Laura Allen
It may depend on the chuck. LeBlonde suggests starting with the manual that came with your chuck. Then they go on to write more on the subject.
formatting link
I'd probably be more inclined to consider LeBlonde to be an authoritative source than a lot of other sources.
"After reassembling the chuck and attaching to your manual, engine lathe like the RKL Series that LeBlond sells, stand to the side of the machine to avoid getting drenched by the oil when the lathe gets up to speed."
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
FYI: My six jaw has a ball oil port right on the face.
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This Sanou does too. What oil do you use?
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I just use #2 way oil on everything except those items that specify otherwise. My CNC rotab, knee mill spindle, and gear boxes on the lathe specify other stuff, and a few things like power feed bevel gears and surface grinder gears specify grease, but for everything else... if it has an oil port I pump it full of #2 way oil.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
I just use #2 way oil on everything except those items that specify otherwise. My CNC rotab, knee mill spindle, and gear boxes on the lathe specify other stuff, and a few things like power feed bevel gears and surface grinder gears specify grease, but for everything else... if it has an oil port I pump it full of #2 way oil.
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Thanks. I use way oil on everything that slides or rotates slowly. It's in a classic brass Eagle #66 oiler that I bought new at the last nearby industrial supply house shortly before it closed.
O'Reilly carries CRC Dry Moly Lube spray on special order. I try to support local stores before ordering on line.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins

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