low melting point metal

Hello!
I just want to know which metals have low melting points in the range of 400 to 600 degrees Celcius?

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Hmmmmm....
Managed to find this place, but can't manage to find what he needs using a search engine.
Can't see him getting a passing mark on that homework assignment at all!
Funny! Sad too!
Cheers Trevor Jones
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On Aug 8, 7:33 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Various alloys of tin, lead, antimony, bismuth.
Micro Mark sells such metal ingots in a couple of melting temps.
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I believe the stuff is Cerrobend or Cerromatrix
http://www.hitechalloys.com/hitechalloys_002.htm
wrote:

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The OP asked about metals melting in the 400C to 600C range, Cerrobend at least melts about 70C, as marked on my ingot.
Sam Soltan wrote:

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wrote:

Ummm, 600 Celsius/Centigrade is 1112 F. Four hundred C. is 752 F.
Steve R.
--
Return address munged, to bugger up spammers!



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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

www.wikipedia.org Periodic chart. Get after it.
Wes
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Also google for "Kaye and Laby", which will get data from the UK National Physical Laboratory (sort of like the US National Bureau of Standards).
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Yo dude.
Ever heard of google? Try "low melting point metal".
Duh!
--
Abrasha
http://www.abrasha.com
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Hmmmmm, that's not low temp.
This is low:
<http://www.mcp-group.com/alloys/lmpa_workh.html
Good luck.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
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Sounds like it's the same alloys called Cerrobend in the US.
| | | Hmmmmm, that's not low temp. | | This is low: | | <http://www.mcp-group.com/alloys/lmpa_workh.html | | Good luck. | | Brian Lawson, | Bothwell, Ontario.
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Brian Lawson wrote:

You can get lower melting point alloys as there are indium alloys which are replacements for mercury at room temps.
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Interesting. Looks like there is only one actual elemental metal in the 400-600 range, plus one "metalloid" element.
I'm assuming that the OP is asking about elemental metals and not alloys?
Hint to the OP---try a Google for "melting point of metals". It's a lot quicker than posting here and waiting for replies.
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