Machine tool history question

I've been reading some old toolmaking books from the early 1900's and I see a lot of face plate work using buttons and boring to do what is
commonly performed on a vertical mill now.
It got me wondering about the evolution of machine tools.
So can anyone put some chronology on when the metal cutting lathe came into existence along with machines such as horizontal mills, vertical mills, shapers, planers, grinders of various types?
Thanks,
Wes_s
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On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 10:21:44 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

======================Among other references you need a Lindsay Books reprint "English and American Tool Builders: The men who created machine tools" by Joseph Wickham Roe. ISBN 0-917914-73-2. http://lindsaybks.com/prod/index.html (may no longer be available from Lindsay but see) (Amazon.com product link shortened)65428244/ref=sr_1_1/103-3246763-1512652?ie=UTF8&s=books http://www.campusi.com/bookFind/asp/bookFindPrefindLst.asp?srchTxtIsbn 17914732 http://www.campusi.com/bookFind/asp/bookFindPriceLst.asp?prodId 17914732
Wish I was back in the classroom. There should be a required machine tools history class for engineeris and technologists.
also see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_Revolution
Unka' George (George McDuffee) .............................. Only in Britain could it be thought a defect to be "too clever by half." The probability is that too many people are too stupid by three-quarters.
John Major (b. 1943), British Conservative politician, prime minister. Quoted in: Observer (London, 7 July 1991).
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Actually lathes are very old. They can be traced back all the way back to the advent of the wheel. Their use with metal occurred when metal became available for use. Your reference of the vertical mill reminds me of the steam chest boring lathe commonly in use at the turn of previous century. Some are still available and incredible useful and affordable for the hobbiest. I almost bought one 2 years ago, but didn't get there in time. Very unfortunate. Steve

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Steve Lusardi writes:

But the carriage on the lathe was not invented until about 1800. Before that tools were held crudely by hand on a tool rest, like a wood lathe. About that time the "automatic generation of gages" was invented, yielding a fundamental precision flat surface, on which, with scraping, machine tool precision is originated. Before that, it was all eyeball and skill, and consequently less than precise.
Early steam engine pistons were packed with wadding, because tolerances were so bad.
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I don't remember this info off the top of my head, but I know where you should look. The best source for this info is the American Precision Museum in Windsor, VT, on the web at http://www.americanprecision.org / They have a huge collection of machine tools going back nearly 200 years, and many of the volunteers are familiar with the old processes. Also the folks at Slater's Mill in Rhode Island http://www.slatermill.org/ have an entire working lineshaft machine shop. In fact, it was at that site that the first screwcutting (ie, having a leadscrew) lathe in America was invented in 1798. Henry Maudsley patented his version in England in 1797. Over the summer I was in the New England area and tried to see as many industrial revolution and machine tool sites as I could fit into the schedule. In addition to the Precision Museum and Slater's mill, I also visited the reconstructed mills and museums of Lowell, Massachussets, and the 1600's ironworks at the Saugus Mill, site of the first major ironworks in North Americ, including a furnace, a rolling and slitting mill, multiple forges, and a casting area, all powered by primitive waterwheels. Hope this info gets you started on some of this historical stuff Let me know if you have any questions, ww88
snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

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woodworker88 wrote:

All:
I had an opportunity to visit the museum in Windsor a year and a half ago. One interesting machine they had was the first Bridgeport mill (i.e serial number of 1.) It was in pretty good condition, too.
Just a little plug for the museum,
-Wayne
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Yep. They also had a fully mechanical "CNC" lathe. Fully automated, but controlled by dogs and cams bolted to a large drum. 4 spindle, multiple operation, with bar feeder.
Wayne C. Gramlich wrote:

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I don't remember this info off the top of my head, but I know where you should look. The best source for this info is the American Precision Museum in Windsor, VT, on the web at http://www.americanprecision.org / They have a huge collection of machine tools going back nearly 200 years, and many of the volunteers are familiar with the old processes. Also the folks at Slater's Mill in Rhode Island http://www.slatermill.org/ have an entire working lineshaft machine shop. In fact, it was at that site that the first screwcutting (ie, having a leadscrew) lathe in America was invented in 1798. Henry Maudsley patented his version in England in 1797. Over the summer I was in the New England area and tried to see as many industrial revolution and machine tool sites as I could fit into the schedule. In addition to the Precision Museum and Slater's mill, I also visited the reconstructed mills and museums of Lowell, Massachussets, and the 1600's ironworks at the Saugus Mill, site of the first major ironworks in North Americ, including a furnace, a rolling and slitting mill, multiple forges, and a casting area, all powered by primitive waterwheels. Hope this info gets you started on some of this historical stuff Let me know if you have any questions, ww88
snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

MIT Press published a series of books on the History of Machine Tools. I assume you could contact MIT Press to get a list of the books in the series. Try interlibrary loan at your local library to borrow them, though they were not terribly expensive- I bought a couple.
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On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 10:21:44 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

This thread reminded me about an article in the paper last week.
"Over the past fifty years, the Antikythera Device has gone from being the most anomalous and controversial artifact to one of the most renowned pieces of evidence of the scientific genius of our ancestors a millennium ahead of its time." See:
http://www.philipcoppens.com/antikythera.html
http://www.giant.net.au/users/rupert/kythera/kythera3.htm
Pretty amazing what the Greeks came up with over 2000 years ago. They must have had some interesting tools back then to make something like this.
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote in

Here are a couple of links that are invaluable.
<http://www.pmpa.org/about/IND/history.htm
Feh. The other one is dead. I have a copy of the pdf though. It's titled "From Archimedes to Automation" the history of the screw machine by Donald Wood.
If interested I could e-mail it.
Without the screw there would be no Industrial Revolution. It only took from Archimedes to Spencer to figure out how to mass produce them. About 250 BC to 1873.
--

Dan

CNC Videos - <http://tinyurl.com/yzdt6d
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That sounds like it should be webbed; can you do that instead?
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On Sat, 09 Dec 2006 13:03:47 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@NOSPAM.hfx.andara.com quickly quoth:

I agree! I wish more people would automatically think of the Dropbox <http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox.html instead of suggesting email to an individual poster.
Please Dropbox it, Dan! (If I may verbify a noun in front of Ed.)
- Press HERE to arm. (Release to detonate.) -----------
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I did think of it, just wasn't sure if it was appropriate.

Done. I'll post a link when it shows up.
--

Dan

CNC Videos - <http://tinyurl.com/yzdt6d
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On 10 Dec 2006 04:07:08 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, D Murphy

Danke mucho, monsieur.
--
- Tom Mix Died For Your Sins -
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Here it is.
<http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/Archimedes-20to-20Automation-1-.pdf
--

Dan

CNC Videos - <http://tinyurl.com/yzdt6d
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I have some web space I'm not using, I could post it there and you could do what you want with the link....
wrote:

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


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Thnaks for the offer.
I posted it to the dropbox.
--

Dan

CNC Videos - <http://tinyurl.com/yzdt6d
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Thanks Dan!
I found it at this link: http://metalworking.com/dropbox/Archimedes-20to-20Automation-1-.pdf
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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote in

Thanks,
I've been busy today putting down some flooring. I finally finished the hardwood, now onto the tile.
The automatic responder told me the file was too baig and was deferred for manual input. Anyway, someone was on the ball and put it in. Thanks.
Don Wood is probably one of the most knowledgeable people on the planet when it comes to old machines, particularly automatics. Every month in his magazine there is a "What is it" contest, similar to the one Rob runs on his blog. Except it features one old machine and you have to guess what it is by maker and model.
--

Dan

CNC Videos - <http://tinyurl.com/yzdt6d
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