History of Machine Tools

I am preparing a research assignment for my students on this subject.
Looking for suggestions as to names which might be used as search
terms or links to sites that would be appropriate.
Also, I am not remembering the names that were involved in the
creation of the first NC machines back in the late forties/early
fifties. I know that the info is back in my head somewhere but it is
not coming forward. Help would be appreciated!
I don't want togfive the kids everything obviously but I do need to
give them enough to get started It is tough to do research on a
subject when you don't know enough about it to even know what
questions to ask.
Thanks for your help!
Errol Groff
Instructor, Machine Tool Department
H.H. Ellis Tech
613 Upper Maple Street
Danielson, CT 06239
860 774 8511 x1811
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Reply to
Errol Groff
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Giddings & Lewis is the first that comes to mind, perhaps Warner & Swasey.
Giddings & Lewis claims they were first in this company history.
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Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
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this is a good site
Reply to
Asp3211968
Hmm. Hardinge, Cataract. Seneca Falls, Barnes. Pittler. Pratt and Whitney.
The earliest NC machine I saw was a Csip horizontal overarm jig borer, running off of paper tape. I think it was 50s vintage.
Photos of old lathe, NOT for sale:
Jim
================================================== please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ==================================================
Reply to
jim rozen
Errol:
The history of Machine tools seems like it would be a interesting subject, BUT... If I were in a limited time machine shop class for the purpose of increasing my skill level with the hope of becoming an employable entry level machinist, I think *I'd* (and probably prospective shop owners might also) be more interested in just HOW to edge find or indicator sweep my parts rather than knowing WHO designed the first edge finder, or indicator, or CNC. Don't take this wrong, I don't mean to be overly critical here, I'm just giving you a view from a job-shop productivity standpoint. If I were interviewing two prospective entry level apprentices I'd be more inclined to hire the one that showed a knowledge of the practical application of theory over one that had historical knowledge.
Reply to
BottleBob
And I couldn't agree more. BUT, I am instructing in a vo-tech system that is run, largely, by academic types and there are things that we are told to do and ways in which to do them. This sort of assignment is one of those things.
Errol
Reply to
Errol Groff
You have a clear eye on "who's paying the bills" and if that person says to do something, they don't really want to hear how it's so much better to do something else. Acceptable answers are:
a) it's done, or
b) I'll have it done by X.
Regards - Jim
================================================== please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ==================================================
Reply to
jim rozen
You may find this site of interest:
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Reply to
Tony Hursh
Start with Leonardo DaVinci?
Reply to
wws
Errol:
Ahh, I see. So you have educational constraints just as job shops have machining constraints spelled out by the customer.
Here are a couple of thread titles with subject matter that touched on the history of CNC:
"history of CNC"
"History Channel /Cincinnati Museum/ machine tool history"
Reply to
BottleBob
Take a look at the American Precision Museum in Vermont web site
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Reply to
Russ Haggerty
Errol,
that topic could be covered in another class. Maybe make it part of the english curriculum. Just as the math classes should be oriented to machining. It would make you job easier if you only had to fill their brains with the actual machine operations.
John
Reply to
john
Don't forget "Jacquard" of loom.
Reply to
Sam Soltan
Hate to mention this, but we received word last week that G&L's foundry is closing permanently.
There is some possibility that our foundry would get some of the work. I work at the former Cincinnati Milling Machine Co. (or Milacron) foundry, now known as Cast-Fab Technologies, Inc.
If you'd like to see some historical photos of the machine tool industry, please go to:
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Click on the search link and type into the search bar "Milling machines and machine castings" WITH the quotes. You will get a hit for a number of photos of the foundry in 1942. The foundry is not identified, but it is the Cincinnati Milling Machine Co. foundry. The reason it was not identified is because it was early on during WW2 and there were fears that sabotage or bombing would take place so the foundry name was kept secret.
Next week the auctioneers will be at the machine shop and everything must go. The foundry is the only part left still producing. Of course we use electric furnaces instead of the cupolas and furan sand instead of green sand but the building itself is still the same.
Mark Fields
Reply to
Mark Fields
IMO, this would be the right approach. Those interested in machining attend a english class that has been tailored to their curriculum.
Again, agreed. Wish I had a choice like this when I was in high school.
Excellent post... almost makes up for your short sighted anti-union one.
LOL
:>)
jon
interesting
Reply to
jon banquer
This ought to get you started. *Smile
The question this group has been looking for a definitive answer for is: How did the "Letter" size drills come into being and why?
Now, a number of members in this group have made some good contributions in support of the origin; but I don't think anyone has been able to "rubber stamp" the quest complete.
Maybe one of your students might take up the banner.
These references come from "Metalworking Yesterday and Tomorrow" The 100th Anniversary Issue of American Machinist The book was given to me by Pete Noling ,who sold me my first Hurco in 1/15/'79 Seaboard Machinery Los Angeles --
Also, I'm pleased to see a group member interested in machine tool history. *Smile I hope we have a continuing dialog.
Best regards to you all,
Stanley Dornfeld
*
*****************************
David Wilkinson screw cutting lathe 1794
Eli Whitney Milling 1800
Simeon North pistols Milling Machine 1813
John Hall Machine developer 1813
Robbins & Lawrence American system interchangeable parts Windsor Vermont 1843 Turret lathe
Leighton A. Wilkie Band saw 1933
Sir Joseph Whitworth 1853 thread form
Joseph R Brown of Brown and Sharpe & Lucian Sharpe Brown's apprentice 1850
Frederick W Howe 1847
William Sellers instituted the 60 degree thread form with a flat on top equal to 1/8 the pitch. 1864
Charles H. Norton grinders 1900
Magnus Wahlstrom & Rudolph F. Bannow The Bridgeport Milling Machine 1927 Boring and Facing head
Richard F. Moore Jig Borer 1924 The Moore Special Tool Company The highest accuracy business in the world.
And!
John T. Parsons The Father of Numerical Control 1948 *********************************
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Reply to
Stanley Dornfeld
Hey Bob...
When I first stood in front of a Bridgeport mill I thought it was just built by a big company. I didn't realize it was designed and built by a person like you or me. It's nice to believe a machinist can build something as cool as a milling machine. You get that feel by reading the history of inventions and their origins.
Also, history gives you a prospective of where the technology is going in the future. By viewing the origin of how an invention was conceived, then where it has come today, it can help us find the direction it will go in the future. If you have an idea where things will go in the future you can make plans to your advantage. *Smile
Regards,
Stan-
Reply to
Stanley Dornfeld
Take a look at the masthead, or at back of the issue, and see who the editors were.
I have a couple of copies, which are worth their weight in gold. But I'll let Errol have one for a while, if he wants to copy anything from it. I wrote a number of the items in that history, mostly about the 1930's and 1940's.
Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
VERY, VERY Coooooooooooooool Ed.
Dang! You're past your thirties. *Grin
Best regards,
Stan-
Reply to
Stanley Dornfeld
Ed:
I would love to have use of the copy! Thanks so much for the offer.
Errol Groff Instructor, Machine Tool Department H.H. Ellis Tech 613 Upper Maple Street Danielson, CT 06239
860 774 8511 x1811
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Reply to
Errol Groff

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