On the renovation of machine tools

Having skimmed though most of the current MEW, I read the article on Buying
and renovating used machinery with interest.
I'm somewhat worried that there is an attitude that regards the renovation of
machine tools as mostly involving a clean and a good paint job. OK, I've spent
the last two years working on the HLV and fully expect to take 18 months on
rebuilding the Beaver mill without even thinking of the paintwork. but surely
you can't count a machine as being renovated if you haven't restored its
original accuracy, can you?
I've seen machines with a nice paint job and unrepaired wear and damage, even
bought one once (knowing what I was buying), but such work tends to make me
lose respect for the person that did the job.
I am thinking of writing up the Beaver job for MEW, but it might turn into a
series rather than a single article...
Am I being overly critical/obsessive?
Mark Rand
RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
Loading thread data ...
Personally, I would view renovation in it's original meaning, from "Nova", meaning "new".
So, no. you're not being overly critical/obsessive, if a machine is not restored to (at least) near-new accuracy, it's not renovated. It's been painted.
Reply to
bigegg
Here in the US a popular brand of spray paint is KRYLON. The joke is that if you paint something to make it look good while nothing has been done to actually fix it it is called a "Krylon rebiuld". ERS
Reply to
etpm
Maybe that article was intended for used machinery dealers? :-))
It seems that they put the machine on a pallet, pull it into the backyard, clean it with the power washer and, after spending 5 minutes for masking off, cover it with some oil tolerant paint. Make a nice photo and ask at least 4 times the price they paid.
Never buy a freshly painted used machinery!
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
You see them on eBay all the time - with tell tale overspray on the adjacent floor! You'd think they had the sense to at least move it before taking the photo
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
I agree entirely with you Mark. The hard bit of renovation is restoring the machine to as close as possible its original accuracy, (within our capabilities) otherwise whats the point? The modern world seems to say that if a job cannot be done in an afternoon or no more than a three page magazine article it is not worth doing. Any more lengthy a project or description is getting boring, attention spans are wavering, time to move on to another more exiting, even quicker bodge. So is it fulfilling and something to be proud of? or just modern short term ism. Alan
Reply to
jackary
The mill which I just bought off ebay certainky hadn't been 'restored', they hadn't even cleaned the swarf off it ;-)
I've never really seen the attraction of spending hours paining up a machine tool, it won't do a better job as a result.
Tim
Reply to
Tim L
Or degreaser :-)
BugBear
Reply to
bugbear
Philistine,
In my immaculate and well designed workshop any slight scratch on my machinery is cause for a complete shit down and restore..........................................................................................................As if...............
John S.
Reply to
John S
restore..........................................................................................................As
I guess you don't suffer from constipation often :)
Reply to
Cliff Ray
This is a good warning to all on the dangers of buying machines supposedly "renovated" by a stealer:
formatting link
I think I found this link on this forum originally.
Reply to
paulwilliams
Mark
Just got round to reading the article and I agree it says more about filler application and paint cutting than anything else. It was definitely not a guide to rebuilding tools. There was a very good article in MEW 32 by David Machin on rebuilding a lathe. That would be a really useful one to put on the soon-to-be-launched MEW website (a hint for David C there). However to remember the author was working on a Raglan Loughborough training lathe that probably saw more paintwork abuse that hard action.....
Please detail the Beaver when you do it, either in MEW or, if it's easier, enter the world of Blogging to tell us all what's happening online.
Charles
Reply to
Charles P
I'll do my best. It'd be nice to start work on it before this summer.
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.