Making a micrometer stop for a Clausing lathe



    [ ... ]

    With a 70 degree included angle, and a normal 90 degrees between the tip and the side of the mill?
    Granted -- 70 degrees seems a lot narrower than on my Clausing lathe -- a 12x24" model 5418/
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes. You need a small relief groove at the apex of the vee, but the ways don't come to a point either, so you're not losing any bearing surface.

Seventy degrees does seem rather steep. The ways on my Monarch are 90 degrees.
--
Ned Simmons

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 01 Jul 2012 21:09:50 -0400
<snip>

Hardly frozen lately. Temp just hit 94 deg and it has been hovering around 90 for over a week now. Suppose to stay that way, maybe get a bit hotter for the rest of the week, sigh...
Wasn't familiar with that company so I looked at the website. They are within spitting distance of the old GM Stamping plant that used to be on 36th St.
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's my mental picture of Michigan (where my Mother came from), and mere facts will have no effect.

There must be a million such companies up there. In Germany, they would be called the Mittlestand. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mittelstand
Joe Gwinn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/1/2012 21:09, Joseph Gwinn wrote:

<SNIP>
We are in the middle of a heat wave right now. Supposed to be near or above 90 all week. I'm in Muskegon, hate to be inland, no offshore breeze.
--
Steve Walker
snipped-for-privacy@frontierbrain.com (remove brain when replying)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You need a real ocean.
Joe Gwinn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sure, I could do all that. I have the sine bar and the gauge blocks. But it's a lot of trouble, and the special tool makes sense to me on an available-time economy basis.
The other problem is that the min distance (which governs the endmill diameter) is a bit small.
Joe Gwinn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

These make milling angles easy:
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31MVrPnD1dL._SL500_AA300_.jpg
Cut the blank longer than the width of the blocks so the vise jaws will grab the ends. Otherwise the work is difficult to hold down
jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, they are a good approach, and I have an adjustable version of the same, and it would not be difficult to adjust the block to the desired angle. This will come in handy for one-off jobs, but for the Clausing V-rail grooves I decided that a specialized tool was worthwhile.
Joe Gwinn
PS: <http://global.rakuten.com/en/store/toolex/item/857295/ Bought used for maybe 10% of listed price; don't recall the details. Nor do I know who sells this in the US.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You did write that you had already ordered them, but it's a good opportunity to discuss alternatives for similar jobs, including those you could use for fine adjustments if the Clausing's angle doesn't exactly match the end mill's.
I bought an expensive new angle cutter while I was unemployed to recut the ways on an old worn lathe, on the trade school's horizontal mill.
jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message news:joegwinn-

Yet another way, would be to offhand grind a single point form tool that matches your tailstock vee and then mount it into a boring bar type of arrangemnet sort of like this:
Here is a good picture:
http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Projects/SwivGripDriver/swivgripdriver07.jpg
This one is even better :
http://tinyurl.com/77ltjzp
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    [ ... ]

    I don't think that would work for a 70 degree *internal* angle. The lathe has a projecting inverted V. The body for the micrometer stop -- or other devices -- is a *female* V.
    I guess that you could use your approach with a dovetail mill to cut the female V.

    A lot easier here -- since the angle is narrower than the end of an end mill, and a HSS lathe bit is cheap enough to grind to a proper point for the task.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 01 Jul 2012 21:09:50 -0400, Joseph Gwinn

You might want to consider installing a Trav-a-dial on your carriage. It measures infinite travel, is always available, and is quick to re-zero. It's one of the most-used accessories on my Clausing 5914.
http://memweb.newsguy.com/~mphenry/TAD-2.JPG
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<Mike Henry> wrote in message wrote:

I like the 2" indicator for threading, the micrometer stop for boring a flat-bottomed recess. It's difficult to stop within 0.001" without overshooting using the carriage handwheel.
jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree with both of you. I have used the dial indicator, and always overshoot, so the plan is to use the indicator to set the stop.
As for the Trav-a-dial, it is the original CRO (Clockface Read Out), and is a real possibility. I think they are still made, but are not cheap.
Mounting a real DRO is likely to be pretty awkward, given that the lathe was not designed for a DRO. I had been toying with mounting a short unit on a bedway fixture that in clamped into place when needed.
Joe Gwinn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 07 Jul 2012 15:25:46 -0400, Joseph Gwinn

Joe - you can find working TADs on Ebay for $150 or so with a bit of patience, though seem to be bringing $200+ recently.
The spherical washers needed for the mount are often missing and are available from McMaster-Carr among other sources. Mine lacked the tensioning device so I cobbled one up in the shop. I can provide drawings for that and for the mount made for my 5914 if you are interested. The mount was made of aluminum plate and bolted together. Welding would be better but the bolted version has been working fine for my needs for 5 or 6 years now.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This seems worth exploration.
What do I look for on fleabay to tell if the unit on offer is any good? Mechanically they are pretty simple, but I doubt that they bounce well.
Joe Gwinn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/14/2012 5:28 PM, Joseph Gwinn wrote:

I've repaired a small pile of Trav-a-dials - they often get gummy from coolant or get swarf in the gears - I've been able to clean them just fine, replace the damaged glass (well, plastic) - just remember to retension the anti-backlash gear upon reassembly
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 14 Jul 2012 20:28:11 -0400, Joseph Gwinn
<snip>

I usually figure that if they look beat up, they are not worth the risk if personal inspection is not possible. In general, you need these components:
1) Bracket 2) TAD base 3) TAD unit (dial) 4) Sphereical washers for 1/4" screws 5) 1/4-28 screws (4)
The bracket is attached to the lathe carriage or mill and is usually custom-made for the machine it will be mounted on, though SWI used to (and may still) sell brackets for common machines.
The TAD base mounts to the bracket and has 2 hard inserts that two of the 1/4-28 screws bear against to adjust the tilt of the base in the lathe X-Y plane (perpendicular to longitudinal travel). The important part here is that the inserts should be flat - some are dented.
The TAD unit has the dials and a wheel that bears againts the bed ways (in the case of a lathe). Swarf from a PO's installation can get inside the unit, which can mess up the clock action. SWI claims that the TADs are not serviceable, though some owners report success. I wouldn't count on it being serviceable so would not pay much for one that was suspect. SWI included a clip and foam gasket that fit over the wheel and (mostly) prevented swarf from getting inside the unit, but these are usually missing. SWI used to supply spares and may still. The dial cover also was a replacement part and I'd order a spare if they are still available. Old ones tend to crack and yellow with age. Naturally you need the dial finger to be intact, too.
A copy of the manual or knowledgeable friend can be nearly essential. There is a calibration procedure which is a more involved than I care to deal with in a newsgroup message. Email me if you want a copy. I get here once a week at most.
There were 2 or 3 different versions over the years. I have manuals for the Series 6 and Series 7/8 models.
Mike
Hopefully someone else will correct any misinformation in the above.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It would be luck indeed if one turned up with the correct bracket, so I expect that I'll be making the bracket.

Is there any reason one could not make the inserts of say O1 steel, and harden them oneself?
I assume that these 1/4-28 screws are nothing special. As for the spherical 1/4 inch washers, one can buy such things from Gibralter and the like.

I've taken dial calipers apart to clean and repair them (including swarf removal). It was fiddly, but wasn't that hard.
The wheel looks like it came from a knurler.

If I score a unit, I'm sure I'll be needing the manual.

Thanks,
Joe Gwinn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.