Mild steel and stregth


What is the tensile strenght of regular mild steel you buy angle and
such at local metal supplier? What would be the advantage of using a
70XXX rod if the stregth of the surrounding metal is less than that?
Why not use a 6011 or other 60 series rod that is less susceptable to
moisture??
Reply to
stryped
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This explains it pretty well...
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Reply to
Doug Miller
Heh, you haven't met stryped before?
Reply to
cavedweller
Now that was pretty good, Doug! ;>)) heh heh ....
Reply to
Phil Kangas
I think it's fairly evident that I *have*.
Reply to
Doug Miller
He isn't the only reader, though.
The welding heat will remove any extra hardness it might have from cold rolling. 6xxx rods oughta work fine, mild steel is about 3xxx, but the best way to know is to make up some sample butt joint welds and bend them over double or until they break. If your weld is stronger than the steel around it what more can you ask?
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
On Wed, 16 Jun 2010 15:07:53 -0700 (PDT), cavedweller wrote the following:
, stryped wrote:
Yeah, why is ANYONE talking to him? GDMF trolls and the weakminded who follow them, anyway...
Reply to
Larry Jaques
So even if it is critical like on a trailer frame, 6011 should be fine? I can weld best with it. People who are good at welding think it is junk and anyone who welds with anythign less than 7018 is stupid...
Reply to
stryped
Theft. If there's a substitute for testing on scrap, I won't trust it.
Reply to
whit3rd
If you look in a welding reference -- the Lincoln Procedure Handbook is a good inexpensive one -- you'll find plenty of pre-qualified welds using 6011 or 6010 that meet code and commercial quality standards, as long as the base metal has good weldability. Ignore anyone who tells you 6011 is junk. If you're welding plain low carbon steels, use 6011 if that's what you're most comfortable with.
Plain structural steel is A36, square and rectangular tube is usually A500, and 1018 is the most common alloy for cold finished bars. Stick to those materials and don't bother with 7018.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Ned, when I tried to use 6011, I had an awful amount of spatter near the welds. Any idea what cuold I do to prevent it (not counting the antispatter spray).
Reply to
Ignoramus24975
Like 6010...6011 does spatter. However..if your power settings are correct and you are keeping the tip submerged in the puddle...it shouldnt be all that bad.
Often times folks run rods way too hot and get all sorts of problems, spatter being one of the biggest.
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
If you have a DC welder, try some 6010 instead, or try your 6011 on DC electrode positive. I've been welding a bunch of heavy 1018 cold rolled recently using Lincoln 5P+ (6010) and any spatter I do get falls off with a quick swipe of a cup brush.
Reply to
Ned Simmons

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