Miniature end mill help

Guys, please help me find some end mills with the following specs;
Material: HSS
Flutes: 2
Cutting diameter: 1/8"
Shank diameter: 3/16"
Other: Center cutting - preferably double ended - less than $5.00 each
I do have the above in end mill sets but need several of this one size. This is for cutting 1/16" 6061/6063 aluminum.
Searched Ebay and Aliexpress to no avail. Can get cheap (and do have) solid carbide 1/8" shank ones but really prefer 3/16" shank HSS.
Thanks!
Reply to
oparr
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There's a tonashit here:
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Mostly 1/8 shank, but shouldn't be a problem to make a bushing iffin u really need a 3/16 shank. Some of it works out to 80c ea, carbide. Yeah, u want HSS and alladat, but sheeit, 80c????
Also, 4 fl ought to be ok for 1/16 sheet. If u got cnc, I'd just move up/down in Z while cutting in X, to spread the chip load, if that would even be nec.
Cheapest at MSC is $12-15.
Reply to
Grokman Grokman
ally need a 3/16 shank.
ut sheeit, 80c????
down in Z while cutting in X, to spread the chip load, if that would even b e nec.
Yeah, have a few 1/8" shank carbides from Ebay, but tool holder changes are a PITA. My "runs" incorporate 1/16" and 1/8" EMs along with #2 center dril ls for countersinking (CNC countersinking metal using EM holder is nirvana) and already have several of these with 3/16" shank except for 1/8" EMs. Ha ve a few from 3/16" shank miniature sets that were reasonably priced but in dividual ones aren't commonplace it seems.
MIC and me are friends.
Reply to
oparr
Here's a link to the miniature sets mentioned;
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And here's the only individual 2 flute HSS 1/8" they sell;
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Think it's reasonable to assume that someone, somewhere, has something similarly priced in 3/16" shank.
Reply to
oparr
Why do you want to run small HSS end mills? They are horrible. I use a lot of 1/8" solid carbide end mills, they work WAY better than HSS. You can watch the tip of the small HSS enc mills wandering around, the tool deflection can equal the tip diameter in some cases. Makes horribly inaccurate work.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
I'm a newb to milling, but I'm certain that if you push a small diameter milling bit to deflect by more than its own diameter, you're pushing it -way- beyond the proper feed speed. Slow 'er down, duuuude.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Larry Jaques fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
It was a stupid, uninformed comment, Larry. You DON'T push endmills to deflect by their own diameter, or they break... period.
That is, unless, like the poster's machine, the spindle or Z slide is so sloppy that IT deflects more than an 1/8" under load!
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I guess every thread needs a little comic relief. If you do something dumb like that with carbide it'll just snap.
Reply to
oparr
Larry Jaques fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Heh! Wouldn't matter. I have had that moron blocked for at least a year, now. The only time I see his brainless natter is when folks quote him!
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Those ems on ebay at 10 for $8 ( 80c each) ends the debate for Moi! Sheeit, it's hard to find drills for 80c each! For those prices, I'd try both carbide and HSS, see what works better. Apropos of jb on cheap carbide, I've used brazed carbide lathe tools that were far worse than HSS.
But with 1/16 6061, sheeit, you could use aviation shears, or a Kleintool nibbler!! lol My biggest concern wouldn't be speed, longevity, or such, just burrs. If I could find an em that made deburring easier, that's the one I'd use.
And if I really needed a 3/16 shank, I'd just make a bunch of adapter bushings.
Reply to
Grokman Grokman
Grokman Grokman fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com:
If you can find an end mill that makes a burr bad enough to be concerned about, then it's either dull or being used at the wrong speeds'n'feeds.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
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Carbide cut is farther from camera in the above shot.
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Carbide cut is nearer to camera in this shot.
Speed: 4000 RPM Feed: 4 IPM (CNC) LOC: 2"
See photo captions for more info.
Reply to
oparr

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