Must cut 40mm hole in 1/4" aluminum bar

I tried a hole saw in my cheap drill press. Works perfectly for
hardwood, but doesn't work for 6061 aluminum. I might try removing some
teeth from a hole saw, see if it cuts a little better without the
chatter. I am familiar with inwards and outwards leaning teeth.
Will I have better luck with a 40mm carbide cutter that has fewer teeth
and maybe better chip removal? The hole diameter must be near perfect,
so I might end up buying more than one (different versions) of those if
it cuts through the material.
Is there a small machine made for cutting shallow holes in metal? I
suppose a good drill press would work, but only if necessary.
I recently purchased DeWalt's small cordless metal cutting bandsaw and
think it's great for cutting most small/narrow aluminum.
I really want to cut that hole.
Thanks.
Reply to
John Doe
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I tried a hole saw in my cheap drill press. Works perfectly for hardwood, but doesn't work for 6061 aluminum. I might try removing some teeth from a hole saw, see if it cuts a little better without the chatter. I am familiar with inwards and outwards leaning teeth.
Will I have better luck with a 40mm carbide cutter that has fewer teeth and maybe better chip removal? The hole diameter must be near perfect, so I might end up buying more than one (different versions) of those if it cuts through the material.
Is there a small machine made for cutting shallow holes in metal? I suppose a good drill press would work, but only if necessary.
I recently purchased DeWalt's small cordless metal cutting bandsaw and think it's great for cutting most small/narrow aluminum.
I really want to cut that hole.
Thanks.
This will do the job.
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Best regards Tom.
Reply to
Howard Beel
The machine tool one short step up from a drill press is a "mill/drill". In my limited experience with substandard import machine tools the floor-stand ones have decent power and rigidity to cut steel but may lack the accuracy to work to 0.001". The RF-31 mill drill from MSC that I used was good to no better than 0.005". It looks like the $1200 Harbor Freight 33686 and might have been adequate for fixing farm equipment, or a hobbyist with the time to fiddle with shims and adjustments. The old original US-made "Buffalo" mill-drill was precise enough to rebore small engine cylinders.
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I can't suggest which to buy since I lucked onto a >60 year old US-made original
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of this:
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I've used the 1990's Enco 100-5100 version of it after cleaning up some small castings that were factory "finished" to wood stove tolerance and considered it the minimum I'd accept for making small machinery with moving parts; shafts and bearings etc. Like my Clausing it can be disassembled into pieces small and light enough to carry up/down stairs.
Unfortunately the good old home shop sized US-made machine tools are now worn, hard to find and priced like new imports.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
some of them . My (Wholesale Tools ZX45) RF45 clone is rigid and accurate enough to machine anything I'm capable of doing . It wasn't cheap at over 1800 bucks , but after the addition of a 3 axis DRO and X axis power feed I think it's every bit as capable as a Bridgeport . Geared head and a dovetail column are the 2 reasons it won out over an RF31 type mill-drill .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
....
As I mentioned, my experience with import mills is limited to a couple of low-end ones I used at work, at electronics companies that barely needed them. The places that employed mechanical engineers had Bridgeports. The Buffalo was in a small engine repair shop and I've only passed on what the owner told me.
Does anyone have a good or bad opinion of the smaller & cheaper ones like the Sieg?
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
While I grabbed time on the CNC mill whenever I could, a DRO or power feed aren't essential if you are shocked by the high cost of just the bare machine. My 1950's Clausing has neither and I haven't been tempted to install the DRO scales I bought for it, which on inspection would require some freehand butchering. A 6" ruler graduated in tenths of an inch easily confirms the dial turns count.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
.125/revolution while the Z moves .100/rev . The power feed is because I'm lazy and it is much more consistent . I get some really smooth finishes now even using a single-point fly-cutter ...
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Ugh! I learned to live with an 8TPI leadscrew but not to like it. To move to 0.6875" (11/16") takes 5 turns to the 0 mark at 0.625", then advance +0.050 to 0.675", +0.010 to 0.685", and +0.0025 to 0.6875". It's like reading a micrometer in steps of 0.025".
Reply to
Jim Wilkins

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