OTish: Anyone use a ColdHeat Soldering Iron?

On 1/3/2013 4:18 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:


I'd bet that used solder is nice and high in Tin! A good mix with bullet lead. If you ever want to sell it, let me know.
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On 1/2/2013 8:09 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Thanks Mike.
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Tom Gardner wrote:

You're welcome. If you can read the label on the old spool, see if you can find the same alloy & gauge. I've had way too many labels fall off spools before they were empty. I do have a bunch of empty orange 1Lb spools I collected whiile I worked at Microdyne. I managed to get them to request them when someone in prduction needed a new spool. Sometimes you can get a spool that's been dropped & broken, real cheap. They are also great for 22-26 AWG hookup wire. :)
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On Wed, 02 Jan 2013 16:16:05 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

It's actually four AAs. That really should be enough. Maybe I'll try that on the ground. Now where's that spare momentary switch...?
--
Inside every older person is a younger person wondering WTF happened.

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On Wed, 02 Jan 2013 21:24:19 -0800, Larry Jaques

Try it with 4 well charged Nimh batteries. It should have more punch.
Gunner
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Gunner wrote:

Using carbon electrodes will limit the maximum current through the joint. You'd need a higher voltage to do much more that what the Alkalines will do. The only advantage of the NiMh is their output don't drop until they are mostly discharged. The old Wahl cordless irons used a pair of C sized NiCad and worked fairly well. The problem is that he needs 25 Watts or more of heat for that wire size to get good wetting on a solder joint. That would be about 5 Amps out of the battery, and the tool was designed for lower output chemistry than NiMh.
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On Thu, 03 Jan 2013 04:23:45 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

True enough. But it would work far better than the carbons and for a longer time. Even at 1.2 volts
Gunner
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Gunner wrote:

What is the resistance between the battery terminal & the item to be soldered? How much resistance does the switch add? What is the maximum current the carbon will handle? How much does the resistance go up with heat? How much waste heat can the cheap plastic case stand before it deforms, or catches fire?
Lots of missing, but critical information. In the commercials & photos they never showed them soldering anything heavier than a component lead. If you want portable, use a 12V jump pack, a step up regulator & a 24 volt soldering iron. Then you can get up to 75 Watts of heat in a short time, and keep it hot for a long time. I'm trying to find a decent steel ammo can around here to build a portable soldering iron into. The battery, charger, regulator, iron holder & iron along with room for a few spare tips, & a roll of solder. All I've found are plastic junk. One slip of the hot iron and you'll burn a hole through it.
Real resistance soldering is generally done with AC, and the transformer primary was switched to minimize losses. It's closer to spot welding than soldering. It's done at lower currents & isn't pulsed, but both rely on fairly high currents through the joint.
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I was given one - have all sorts from large black beauties down.
It is a conductive short that heats up the work - the work must be the conductor. If the current is high enough, it gets hot and you can melt onto the hot metal.
Remember the short must be held for a while - not moved around or on - off.
Martin
On 1/1/2013 11:01 PM, Tom Gardner wrote:

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Martin Eastburn wrote:

Classic resistance soldering, scaled down to hobby level applications. Any surface resistance of the wire prevents it from heating at the availible current. The current has to be high enough to heat the copper past the melting point of the solder. 14 AWG runs near room temperature at 15 Amps. That means you'll need enough current to heat it to around 700 F
BTW: Here is more than you ever wanted to know about AWG copper wire:
http://library.bldrdoc.gov/docs/nbshb100.pdf
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Bigger wire... Bigger soldering iron...
Solid wire absorbs more heat than stranded wire, and its harder to use solder to transfer heat.
I have battery operated on in my tool pouch that works wonders on 18 ga or smaller stranded with fine solder.
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On Tue, 01 Jan 2013 18:43:13 -0800, Larry Jaques

I've had one for 3 years. Used it twice. Once successfully. I don't mind admitting I was a sucker.
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wrote:

-- Louis L'Amour
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Many propane torch kit used to come with a chisel point soldering attachment like the one included above. I have one that I use for soldering heavier gauge wire. Mine is made with a short 3/8" dia copper chisel point rod held onto a brass holder that clamps onto the end of a propane torch. The brass holder has holes to allow the flame from the propane torch to exit, but still heat the copper rod. Could be easy to make one if you can't find one second-hand.
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