Ping Jim Wilkins - Lithium Ion Jump Starter and Power Pack at Harbor Freight

On Mon, 2 Jan 2017 22:33:50 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"


To shade your roof, put the panels on a raised metal framework (chain link top rail works well and is inexpensive) and run shade cloth under it. A couple hundred dollars worth of cloth every few years will make the house a lot more comfy in the summer. Lose the tree and build the shade over the house. It'll be less overall work (no leaves!) and you can use the firewood in the winter.
I just noticed that I had a small amount shade over the center of the roof in the winter afternoons, so I moved the solar panel site to the peak of the far east edge. Even partial temporary shade is a killer for solar.

If he was smart, he'd have paid you for that work, too.
- If ever the Time should come, when vain and aspiring
Men shall possess the highest Seats in Government,
our Country will stand in Need of its experienced
Patriots to prevent its Ruin. -- Samuel Adams
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I take it Grant's Pass has no storms or building inspectors. New England is downwind of everyone else between Hudson's Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, and gets samples of all their weather, including tornadoes. Hurricane Katrina passed over us.
The KillAWatt EZ says running my air conditioner costs $5 per month in midsummer. I salvaged a friend's ripped ShelterLogic car shelter by covering the roof with another heavy-duty silver tarp with the edges stapled and rolled around 1x3s (ripped from PT decking) and screwed to the rib tubes. A $100 tarp won't last over 5 years. When I tried suspending a tarp over the woodpile, the wind tore it up in two years. -jsw
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On Tue, 3 Jan 2017 22:17:58 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

They do, but this is county out here, 3.5mi from the big (32k) city. But external shading devices won't have a whole lot of oversight even in the city, with the exception of Gnu Yawk, who has its own codes for each and every block, it seems.

So putting the cloth on cables and pulleys to retract during storms might be in order.

That's not bad at all. Are you certain of its low cost?

Tarps die quickly in wind, but shade cloth lasts a bit better, passing a lot more air than a tarp does. I lost a new tarp on the way home from my sister's (350mi) because her masseur wanted me to bring his massage table home with me to repair. It caused a gap in the boxes I had packed in the bed and the air forced the tarp out of place every time I tried. 200# of crap on top of it plus a 1" band around it all (toward the base), and it still kept tearing loose. Anyway, I'm left with a 10x10 out of a 10x20' Stansford standard tarp now. The other half shredded.
Anyway, I'm talking about this stuff http://tinyurl.com/z6fuak4 a 64-77% shade fabric. I like the tan color the best. It's cooler than green or black. http://www.harborfreight.com/12-ft-x-19-ft-6-in-mesh-all-purposeweather-resistant-tarp-60584.html
Interesting climate you live in, though, Jim. Storms, lightning, hurricanes.
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On Wed, 4 Jan 2017 10:07:54 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

I think I forgot to comment on that. The weather forecasts are accurate NOWHERE, and that's one reason climatologists (and AGWKers) have no clue, either. We don't yet have all the data points we need for proper casting, so the models are -all- lacking.
--
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On Wed, 04 Jan 2017 19:49:05 -0800, Larry Jaques

As complex as the "weather engine" is here between the lakes in Ont-Aiy-O, it's surprising how accurate they are sometimes. How much rain or snow is often WAY off -at least in some areas. We used to be real "snow belt" - but now we seam to be in a "shadow". Might get six inches within 10 miles to the east or west, and get half an inch here. The temperature and wind forcasts are "usually" pretty close.
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On Thu, 05 Jan 2017 17:52:04 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Well, they do make mistakes. <g>

A friend of mine used to drive between Philly and Ontario and couldn't believe the difference a mile made around Buffalo, when lake effect snow hit. It went from 2" to 2' on occasion.
--
The goal to strive for is a poor government but a rich people.

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On Wed, 04 Jan 2017 19:42:07 -0800, Larry Jaques

We call 'em "pigs ears"

Snipped

Between the lakes up here "Dry Canadian Air" is pretty rare!!!

Snipped

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On Sun, 1 Jan 2017 17:12:09 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

I hear that. Hopefully, the cloning process gave another 8 lives.

From the dirty/square output and GFCI problems? (Hmm, my UPS just cycled and the lights dimmed for half a second.)
My concern is for my Carrier Infinity HVAC system. It's a 120v electronic unit with variable speed DC motor (part of the reason my electric bills are lower). When the power goes down, I'll probably want heat, so my inverter will likely have to be a decent pure sine wave model. The existing is a 2kw HF mod sine, and might not do. My well pump is 240v, so my long-term grid-down dilemma is: do I go with a 240v inverter plus step-down xfmr for heat and lights, or a 120v PSW inverter with step-up for pump, or add an installable 24v replacement pump and replumb as necessary? The simplest solution is to win one of the many multi-million dollar lotteries and do all the above (plus a metal roof and another 15kw in solar) for redundancy.
- If ever the Time should come, when vain and aspiring
Men shall possess the highest Seats in Government,
our Country will stand in Need of its experienced
Patriots to prevent its Ruin. -- Samuel Adams
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wrote:

SCRs don't work right with a "modified sine wave" which is simply alternating plus and minus 170V square pulses, narrowed to equal the RMS power level of a 120V sine wave.
I'd consider adding an extra water storage tank and picking up a fixable 120/240V gasoline generator to run the pump when the tank empties or you are showering. Your water heater could be receiving room instead of ground temperature water to heat.
I bought an old 3750W Coleman for $100 to run my washing machine and air compressor after needing both during a week-long outage. Both draw over 30A starting current. The Coleman doesn't play well with the APC but it's fine for larger power tools. It just needed a little carb work.
I assume that the storm that caused the outage will do damage I need to repair quickly. The 1998 ice storm left a dozen holes in my roof from a fallen tree top, the 2011 "Halloween" storm damaged the roof of my tool shed. In '98 I had only a 500W ham radio generator that would run no more than a sabre saw, or recharge battery tools. Luckily my Makita 9.6V panel saw was the perfect tool to repair the plywood. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_Halloween_nor 'easter "In some areas of Connecticut, outages lasted as long as 11 days."
-jsw
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On Mon, 2 Jan 2017 11:48:31 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

The pump house is now fully insulated, but it still gets down to 40 in the winter and up to 80 in the summer. But that is another possible solution. Thanks.
The easiest fix for a long-term grid problem is probably a 120v PSW inverter and 120vac pump, since they'd be a do-it-once then hands-off forever. It'd be a real hassle to go out several times a day to crank up the genny to get the pressure up on the water, or listen to the noise all day if left on.
Best guess is that the phone/DSL would be down along with the power. I'd be looking for shelter, heat, water, and power to cook. In a pinch, I can set up the camp woodstove for heat and cooking. The HF solar set can power my kindle, which still has over 100 unread books on it, saved for that purpose.

It's amazing to think that so many people practically throw away because of some simple problem. I have harvested hundreds of them along the way. Vacuum cleaners with a cat toy blocking the intake or broken belt. Golf cart with a bad battery cable. Tons of gas weed eaters, tillers, and mowers with plugged/gummy carbs or bad gas. Power tools with broken switches, or cords, or ends. I love it!

That's why I took out 4 trees on my lot. Anything within range of the canopy is a target when (not if) the tree goes down.

Yeah, I remember that and was really, really glad I lived on the opposite coast. This snow we're getting is unusual, but it isn't sticking. It melted and snowed again 3 times today. The norm is one year out of four (or 2/5, worst) for snow down here, and even then it's only an inch or two for a day or three.
Y'all can -have- your real storms, TYVM. I wonder how hard this one is going to affect the rest of the country. 2x-4x worse, I'd wager. Got preps?
- If ever the Time should come, when vain and aspiring
Men shall possess the highest Seats in Government,
our Country will stand in Need of its experienced
Patriots to prevent its Ruin. -- Samuel Adams
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wrote:

Sure you can collect a lot of good stuff cheap that way (I have), but it all has other problems waiting to jump out when you need the thing. -jsw
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On Mon, 2 Jan 2017 22:47:38 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

Most of this stuff is repaired and sold for a good profit, funding more tool purchases. Dead tools I tend to fix and keep. (Thanks, Gunner!)
- If ever the Time should come, when vain and aspiring
Men shall possess the highest Seats in Government,
our Country will stand in Need of its experienced
Patriots to prevent its Ruin. -- Samuel Adams
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Will the Viking Lithium-Ion jump starter and power pack jump start an ATV with 6V battery?
On Friday, December 30, 2016 at 10:16:56 AM UTC-7, Leon Fisk wrote:

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I have a different brand of Lithium jumpstarter which is claimed to protect against such serious mistakes by not applying power to the battery clamps unless it detects a serviceable 12V battery hooked up in the right direction.
The user's manual https://manuals.harborfreight.com/manuals/62000-62999/62749.pdf surprisingly doesn't warn against connecting the clamps to the wrong voltage, like 6V or 24V DC or 120V AC. If you are lucky the green light won't come on after it checks the battery when you press the Starter button.
If you aren't lucky, see the paragraph "WARNING! RISK OF EXPLOSION.
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On Sat, 24 Nov 2018 09:40:41 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A 12v jump starter will likely cause overvoltage problems on a 6v system. I would not try it myself.
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and that we can do nothing to change it look before they cross
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That's something we might have gotten away with in the old days of mechanical ignitions and lead -acid battery jumpstarters, which were more tolerant of abuse (and cheaper and easier to repair) than modern electronics and Lithium batteries.
I could MacGyver the 12V jumpstarter to safely charge the 6V battery if I had to, it's not impossible, but if you have to ask how you probably shouldn't try.
Google shows several 6V/12V battery chargers. When you remove the old battery, use the wrench or screwdriver to disconnect the (-) negative terminal first so it won't short-circuit if it touches other metal. Once all negative wires are disconnected there's no voltage between the (+) positive terminal and the frame.
-jsw
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Disconnecting the 6V battery before charging will protect the vehicle electronics, but there's still a chance that the large voltage difference will force a charging current of hundreds of amps, enough to make damaging arcs, burn the connections or destroy the Lithium. Then again the dead battery may be sulfated and draw hardly any current with 12V applied.
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