Propane tanks

I have decided to make a bbq cooker out of a propane tank if I can find one of the appropriate size. A friend of mine owns a supply house, and I
believe they will have a dead one or two I can cut up and use. I was going to make a brick one in the back yard, and then a guy at my church wants me to cook up some stuff for July 18th. One on wheels would do what I need, and be available for others, too.
I know to flush, fill with water, etc, to cut it.
How about removing the mercaptan smell? Once I get it open, what should I do to kill that smell, or will heating it up with charcoal for the first time do the trick?
Electric wirebrushing? Scrubbing with some type of cleaner?
???
Steve
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I heard that Clorox works. I am sure that a good fire will also kill that smell.
i
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Bite the bullet and go buy yourself a Webber 22 1/2" [1] charcoal BBQ. You'll never look back.
They work really well, and will put big smiles on your face till your a little old man.
Had mine since the early 80's... probably used it once a week average, and it's still going strong. Replacement parts are available (but I've yet to need any).
http://www.weber.com/explore/grills/charcoal-series/one-touch-silver-22-1
(Amazon.com product link shortened) LU/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid40000982&sr=8-4&keywords=webber+22.5+gold
Even used from Craigs list they're great, long as the porcelain isn't chipped, there are no missing parts and corrosion/rust of legs and grates is reasonable.
They make other charcoal models with any bell/whistle imaginable... but the basic ones are more than satisfactory.
Erik
[1] If just cooking for 2 or 3, go for the 18 1/2" model.
http://www.weber.com/explore/grills/charcoal-series/one-touch-silver-18-1
(Amazon.com product link shortened) />/ ref=sr_1_3?s=lawn-garden&ie=UTF8&qid40001070&sr=1-3&keywords=webber+18 .5
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On Sun, 17 Jun 2012 13:15:46 -0700, Steve B wrote:

[snip]
It might make no difference in smell removal, but according to <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquefied_petroleum_gas the odorant in use nowadays is ethanethiol.
Wikipedia says "In the United States, tetrahydrothiophene (thiophane) or amyl mercaptan are also approved odorants, although neither is currently being utilized." This doesn't agree with <http://www.msdshazcom.com/MSDS/E/exxon/wcd002fe.htm or <http://www.suhresgas.com/help/LP_GAS_ORORIZATION_INFO.html . The former says "Exxon, like many other propane marketers, uses ethyl mercaptan as the odorant, adding it in a ratio of 1.5 lb per 10,000 gallons of propane..." and the latter says "In order to detect presence and prevent an explosion from a buildup of propane gas, odorant (almost always ethyl mercaptan) is added to liquid LP-Gas. Ethyl mercaptan has a distinctive order and has a high odor impact. To familiarize yourself with this type of odor you can request “Scratch and Sniff” leaflets from the National Propane Gas Association..."
Does anyone here know for certain what's used now?
--
jiw

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Ethyl mercaptan is the old common name (along with mercaptoethanol) for the more IUPAC-correct ethanethiol. Same compound, structurally CH3CH2SH, ethanol with the oxygen replaced with sulfur. Never tried to wash it out but I have to think that bleach followed by fire should do the trick :-).
----- Regards, Carl Ijames "James Waldby" wrote in message
On Sun, 17 Jun 2012 13:15:46 -0700, Steve B wrote:

[snip]
It might make no difference in smell removal, but according to <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquefied_petroleum_gas the odorant in use nowadays is ethanethiol.
Wikipedia says "In the United States, tetrahydrothiophene (thiophane) or amyl mercaptan are also approved odorants, although neither is currently being utilized." This doesn't agree with <http://www.msdshazcom.com/MSDS/E/exxon/wcd002fe.htm or <http://www.suhresgas.com/help/LP_GAS_ORORIZATION_INFO.html . The former says "Exxon, like many other propane marketers, uses ethyl mercaptan as the odorant, adding it in a ratio of 1.5 lb per 10,000 gallons of propane..." and the latter says "In order to detect presence and prevent an explosion from a buildup of propane gas, odorant (almost always ethyl mercaptan) is added to liquid LP-Gas. Ethyl mercaptan has a distinctive order and has a high odor impact. To familiarize yourself with this type of odor you can request "Scratch and Sniff" leaflets from the National Propane Gas Association..."
Does anyone here know for certain what's used now?
--
jiw



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Steaming for about 4 hours will get rid of about 80% of the smell. The rest can be neutralised with a wash down with potassium permanganate 10% solution, then steam again.
Its likely that the smell will recur as it really does get into the metal.
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Steve B wrote:

BEFORE you open it dump in a gallon of clorox and 10 gallons of water. Roll it around and let it set a while. Then let it drain. Now cut it open. Use a solution of 10% potassium permanganate and spray it down.
If you plan on splitting it and using hinges on parts of the top weld angle strips around the cut areas before you cut. That way the cut areas are reinforced and all you need to do add the hinges.
--
Steve W.

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Steve B wrote:

TOTALLY unnecessary! Just cut it - there's no oxygen in the tank to support combustion and no pressure to force anything but tiny amounts of gas out. I have done it many times.

As others have said: bleach. Forget the potassium permanganate - you'll have a devil of a time finding it and it's unnecessary (use a burn-in fire to remove residual oil, etc & Bob's your uncle).
Not your uncle, Bob
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On 6/17/2012 4:15 PM, Steve B wrote:

YES, wirebrushing! THAT'S the ticket!
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