reciprocating saw blade recycling

i've been chewing though sawblades on my reciprocating saw for various
projects and i was stuck by an idea. is there any reason the old
reciprocating saw blades off my sawzall could be turned into parting
tools on the lathe?
does anyone know enough about those blades to say if they are tool
steel right through or if only the teeth are?
Reply to
Brent
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Seem rather thin for most lathes. Might make a good flat spring for a firearm.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Hacksaw blades do not make good lathe tools. They are fairly good for knife making.
Bob Swinney
i've been chewing though sawblades on my reciprocating saw for various projects and i was stuck by an idea. is there any reason the old reciprocating saw blades off my sawzall could be turned into parting tools on the lathe?
does anyone know enough about those blades to say if they are tool steel right through or if only the teeth are?
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Reply to
Robert Swinney
i think the teeth are.
Reply to
fpena445
If they are at all flexible then only the the teeth are hss, but you can always cut new teeth in them with a cutoof wheel and sharpen them on a belt sander to be good enough for wood and demolition.
Reply to
beecrofter
Sawzall blades are very highly sought after in prison, where they make wonderful weapons.
I volunteer in a maximum security prison ..
Grant
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Most high quality recip blades are bi metal, meaning that the backs are soft and can bend without snapping and the teeth are hardened and bonded to the softer blade. Just not much there for recycling.
Reply to
DanG
Good knives for one use, maybe. I ground an edge on the back of one to make a collapsible survival knife. The saw teeth hold up well but the blade dulls after sharpening one or two oak tent pegs. I filed the teeth cross-cut and carry a small triangular needle file to keep it sharp.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
"beecrofter" (clip) you can always cut new teeth in them with a cutoof wheel and sharpen them on a belt sander to be good enough for wood and demolition. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ If you hold a dull blade gently against a belt sander, so that the worn tips of the teeth are cut off, the blade can be used some more. It won't be the same as new teeth, because the tips will be flat, but it will still cut better than a totally dull blade.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Have a look at
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Andrew VK3BFA
Reply to
vk3bfa
Apparently a plastic phone card with nicks cut in the edge is good for use as a weapon too.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy

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