Removing broken hitch ball?

Larry Jaques wrote:


(...)
That'd work. Most the time I don't bother though.
My solar powered vent fan clears the room amazingly quickly! Luckily I don't have to use a cut off tool in an enclosed space often.

Discs to arbors. Ya need a hand to hold the arbor, a hand to hold the disc, a hand to hold the screw and driver.
An elastomer-coated gadget to hold the arbor and disc in alignment with a screwdriver constrained to the center of the arbor would be really neat for the non-Shivas among us.
Extra points for magnetizing the screwdriver to hold the fastener.

Yup. You are Larry, all right. 00
--Winston
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Grab the disk between thumb and middle finger, hold screw head in place lightly with index finger, spin on the arbor with the other hand. Sheesh!
jsw
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Jim Wilkins wrote:
(...)

That'd work if the hole in the middle of the disc were a tiny bit larger than the OD of the screw. I could just drop the threads of the fastener into the disc. Easy!
The discs I purchase have a hole that is somewhat smaller than the OD of the fastener, so it takes two hands just to grind the fastener through the mounting hole. It is a dicey operation because it takes force to drill the fastener through the mounting hole but too much force and the disc shatters into two pieces. It'd be cool to have a jig that holds everything in alignment to make the operation quick and painless.
--Winston
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On Mon, 6 Feb 2012 12:29:11 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

If you're good in 3-D, assemble the screw and washer to the disc and power up the die grinder slowly. Now move the screw into mesh with the end of the arbor and HIT IT! It self-tightens.
If you're not good, visually, it will crossthread the arbor and screw like a bitch on steroids and you'll have to replace both. ;)
-- Energy and persistence alter all things. --Benjamin Franklin
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wrote:

OK, cool. (absolutely no pun intended in February)

Aw, ya semiarticulated wuss. No extra Shiva arms necessary.
You hold the screw and washer with your thumb and forefinger, the arbor with your little and 4th fingers, and steady the disc with the middle finger and 4th, leaving the other hand to hold the screwdriver and screw it! I used to be the GOTO guy at the shop to wedge my whole arm into the least accessible places to start a left handed screw upside down while holding the other parts with other fingers, all sight-unseen.

:]
-- Energy and persistence alter all things. --Benjamin Franklin
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wrote:

Disk with screw through the hole held between thumb and second finger of the left hand with the first finger pushing lightly on the screw head; arbor between right thumb and first finger, bring into position and spin it up snug - no need for the screw driver as the screw will self tighten under load, the screw driver is only used to loosen the screw for removal. YMMV but that's how I've been doing it for close to forty years.
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snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com wrote:
(...)

Upthread, I explain that the screw does not simply drop into the hole in the disc because said hole is too small. Once the screw is in the disc, life becomes very easy indeed.
--Winston
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wrote:

Another use for the (tiny) screwdriver - works well if it is the traditional shape - do the whole batch of disks and be done with it till you buy another batch.
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snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com wrote:
(...)

Upthread, I mentioned that I normally have multiple arbors with discs attached so that I can swap discs quickly when I'm in the middle of a project. That works a treat!
This Just In! I used a loose drill chuck just now as a pin vise to grasp the head of the arbor screw.
Now I can thread the cutting discs on to the screw quickly and easily.
That made my day!
--Winston
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Winston wrote:

I tend to load my discs by laying them on a chunk of wood that has a small hole in it. Set disc over hole, push screw through slide arbor up through hole from other side to catch screw and tighten down a bit.
I also have saw blades, diamond wheels and sanding discs all loaded up as well.When I buy new stuff I usually buy kits so I get some extra arbors for buffing/sanding drums/wheels. One thing I have found with the cutting discs is that if you install a small O-ring or rubber washer on each side they don't break as easily.
--
Steve W.

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The good mandrels come that way, with a cushion washer or two. Also are a close fit on the cutoff disks without needing a whole lot of persuasion to go through the hole. If they don't have a washer, the hole in the disk wallows out, eventually the screw wears at that point and the mandrel becomes useless as well as busting a lot of disks. So be careful with cut-rate mandrels. The ones that usually come with the HF all-up hand grinder accessory sets seem to last OK. I was buying those for like $8 for a 100+ piece set at one time, they want a lot more now. Each had a pile of cutoff wheels plus several mandrels for same as well as a lot of lesser used pieces. They all worked fine with the mini-die grinders. Usually have several of those rigged up at any one time to save time when changing grinding points. A whole lot faster setting one down and picking up another rather than digging out the collet wrenches.
Tip: Punch a hole in each wrench and string some beaded chain between, then you'll have an exact copy of what Foredom has for their collet chucks. No more lost wrenches and they can be hung on a hook on the bench.
Stan
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Steve W. wrote:
(...)

OIC. Now I know what Forstner bits are for. :)
No matter what method is used, I think it would be great to have a recess-hex head on the arbor screw so that one could trap it on the end of an Allen driver using one's finger nail.
These look to be an M1.8 x 0.35 TP.

Something like this, say? http://www.unicorpinc.com/metric_insulating_washers-flat-_.082.htm
--Winston
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wrote:

I have a couple of spark wheels from disposable lighters mounted on mandrels (make certail to get the solid not the spiral wound ones, and use the O ring from the jet for centering) to use as rotary files.
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snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com wrote:
(...)

That is way 'out of the box' thinking.
Cool!
--Winston
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    [ ... ]

    How about if you want to cut an eggshell in half -- cleanly. You obviously need some soft but steady support for the eggshell, and a way to minimize shaking of your hand if you are hand holding the Dremel, but with soft wrist support, and working seated at a workbench, you should have enough control to do a clean job on the eggshell. Now the remaining question is *why* do you want to cut an eggshell -- and that is going to be your problem, but if I ever need to do that, I have the tools. (Ideally, the flexible shaft version of the Dremel -- or even better a Foredom drive and shaft, and an extra flexible handpiece to go with it. (I use that for tuning concertina reeds among other things, but with wheels about 1/8" thick or so. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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Which way around, for cutting the eggshell in half? A Raw egg?!
The thin, small diameter disks aren't intended to be panel cutting discs.. the disk doesn't approach a large surface squarely, like a circular saw blade generally does, for example. Still, with a steady grip, one can make cuts in wide areas while maintaining the pitch required. The small disks, even when used with the Dremel 90 degree adapter still don't have large enough diameter to cut perpendicularly in a large/wide surface.
One fairly useful purpose I've found for the thin abrasive disks, is to cut a clean slot in a stripped/deformed screw head to make removal possible with a flat blade screwdriver, and if the screw head is recessed, the small disks only cause minimal damage to the surrounding material. When I've worn the small disks down to a smaller size, I leave them mounted for uses where a fresh full sized disk wouldn't fit the application.
The dirt cheap diamond grit metal disks are great for a lot of cutting uses too, and almost unbreakable (can't imagine how one would break them, but I suppose it's possible).
A 1/16" or smaller veining cutter (ground cutting teeth not abrasive) works very well in a Dremel with the router base accessory, for cutting out curvy lines in acrylic sheet or other suitable materials.
The old Handee accessories included some unique drills, in that the cutting section was ground as a very short "head" with 2 flutes like a regular drill point end, with a thinner shank section behind it.. very well suited for using with a small motor, low-powered tool.. less rubbing on the sides of a hole.
I suppose the machines that grind the various types of miniature cutters must be fascinating to see or watch in operation.
--
WB
.........


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Me too... luckily haven't needed one for some years now, but it's nice to know they're there.
Erik
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