Roof top rack (metal related)

2008 Kia Rondo. Have two roof rails on top of car but no cross members. Dealer wants $200 for a pair of cross members. Too much money at this time.
Wrecking yards don't have this model (2006 - 2008) in stock.
How hard would it be to make some cross members. I've never looked at one up close, but am told that the end caps of the rails come off and the cross-members slide inside a slot therein. I'm thinking of maybe 1/4"x2"x6" plate for the sliders. The cross member would simply be 3/4" conduit welded to the plates. I need to carry 15 pieces of 20' long 3/4" PVC to help a friend with a water line installation. Not a lot of weight. I could buy 10 foot pieces, but, I'm also taking 3 passengers and 30 pieces would not fit inside the car. Because of the passengers I'm not taking my P.U. truck. 3 hour long trip.
Anybody fabricate something similar? Any advice? Comments? Etc.
Thanks, Ivan Vegvary
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I would see if there is a Thule or Yakima application and check craigslist. It will be more useful in the future.

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2x4's on top with big u-bolts or long bolts going thru a piece of strap that goes under the front/rear runner.
Dave
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On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 14:51:49 -0700, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

...
The side rails are shorter than 6' (or look like it, at <
http://z.about.com/d/cars/1/0/-/V/1/kia_08rondo_ltrear.jpg ) so 20'
pieces would stick out 7' at each end -- 10' probably is the longest pieces that would ride ok on top. Eg lay a 2" 4x8' of blue insulation board on top, then 1/2" plywood, then the pieces of pipe.
Can you buy the pipe at the other end of the trip? What about rolls of flexible pipe? You could order something like following for delivery to destination; don't know if it's a competitive price. <http://www.pexsupply.com/Rifeng-100-300-OXY-1-Oxygen-Barrier-PEX-Tubing-300-ft-Coil
--
jiw

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wrote:

Last time Junior needed my 20' extension ladder (aluminium), I snapped a set of canoe carrier foam blocks on appropriate rungs and tied the ladder down through the door openings with web straps. Of course I was only going across town but see no problem in longer distance, and 20' lengths of PVC would lay nicely on the ladder with 5' overhang. I would recommend serious tying of the bundle in case of rapid decleration. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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For a one time thing like you are describing, I would lash something on for crossbars. But something more substancial than 3/4 inch conduit. More like 2 by 4's. I would also lash the pvc pipe together, maybe use filament tape. The weight is only part of why you need more strength. The wind loads are likely to be more than the weight as far as a load. Imagine yourself going sixty mph and having some thirty mph cross winds.
I might cut those 20 foot lengths in half before loading them on the car top. Couplings are not that expensive.
Dan
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Ditto on the 2x4s, lashed with rope and used only for support, tie the load to the OEM vehicle rack and the bumpers, front and rear. I leave stainless steel shackles in the vehicle frame tie-downs, which are rough-edged enough to damage rope.
My CRV has a similar rack. For 20' plastic pipe or 12' corrugated roofing I put long or spliced 2x4s lengthwise on the rack for extra support.
10' 2x4s cut in half for the crossrails leave extended ends to tie down 4' x 8' panels. Another 5' piece tied on top will hold a sheet down very securely. Tack some carpet on the ends to protect your scalp. They are easier than 4' ones to load a heavy canoe without banging it or your hand into the car.
When I carry sheetmetal I also bring cardboard to protect the rope from the edges. There's usually a sheet of it under the carpet in the back, or on the carpet if the load is oily.
For me 1/4" or 5/16" braided polyester rope works best, it holds knots well and doesn't stretch in the rain like nylon. I cut a 100' piece into 4 sections and melted the ends so they don't unravel in the wind. Ratchet straps are OK if you can't tie good knots, as long as the hooks will fit over the rack rails. I have a few cutoffs of climbing rope to catch emergency braking loads, especially for the canoe.
jsw, who has carried the lumber for several theatre sets in/on a tiny 1974 Civic.
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On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 05:01:38 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@krl.org"

Or tie on a 4x4 or strong piece of pipe, and strap the PVC to it. It wont be an issue for most vehicles...but the long bit sticking out the front really needs to be secured. A V down to the front bumpers really helps.
Gunner, who lately has been hauling a LOT of PVC pipe.
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" snipped-for-privacy@krl.org" wrote:

I just wrap a 3/8" rope along the entire 20' length, and tie the ends to the bumpers of my truck. I lay a towel on the roof of the cab to protect the paint. I have never had any porblems, even at 55 MPH.
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