Silicone grease removal

I've tried all the common shop solvents to get silicone grease/oil off of ignition wire ends don't want to damage the silicone rubber boots
or wires. Soaps maybe?? TIA
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Jerry Wass wrote:

Dawn...
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wrote:

Try isopropyl alcohol.
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On Fri, 04 Jan 2008 01:20:24 -0600, Don Foreman

And not the stuff most drug stores sell as rubbing alcohol which is labeled as 70% Isopropyl alcohol. They don't say what the other 30% might be - Maiden water? I got Isopropanol from a local shop which is labeled as 99% - see: http://www.rougier.com/newEnglish/display_products.asp?sectionid=2&pid6 Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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On Fri, 04 Jan 2008 03:52:55 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, Jerry

Steam cleaning should fix you up quickly. Then an alcohol bath?
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Why do you want to remove it? It does serve a purpose. It makes the terminal easier to install, seals out moisture, and keeps it from sticking to the plug over time.
Carl Boyd
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Carl Boyd wrote:

By the time I GET THEM , THEY'RE FULL OF GREASE DIRT SAND & GRASS & NEED CLEANING---THEN i'M GONNA RE-GREASE 'EM. jERRY
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I hope you realise it is against the law in some jurisdictions to use WIRE ignition leads because of there interference they cause.
Why don't you stop being a skin flint and just buy new proper leads?
John G.
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wrote:

Spiral wire core is legal in ALL jurisdictions as they are the BEST RFI suppression wires available. They are STANDARD EQUIPMENT on most higher end vehicles today.
Also known as Magnetic Suppression wire.
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<clare at snyder.on.ca> wrote in message

Thanks for the info. I learn someting new every day, even after learning for about 26000 days. I did not recognise the significance of SPIRAL Wire, but now understand. -- John G.
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John G wrote:

Thanks, to whomever enlightened John G. I was just going to explain that you can't buy the mid-90's ford clip-on Coil terminals by themselves & I don't think anybody kits them with wire core wires.---besides that, I should have been posting on rec aviation homebuilt--but there's a lot more guys on this gp that remove silicone grease.--Jerry
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I don't know Jerry, but I can tell you what doesn't work. Dish soap, alcohol, trico,, gasoline, brake cleaner, bug and tar remover and acetone. If you figure it out, let me know. Steve

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I'm curious how silicone grease got on the wire ends in the first place. Anyway, VM&P Naptha or even paint thinner will dissolve silicone grease, and will swell the silicone rubber if too much is absorbed. The solvent will evaporate without much effect on the rubber. I'm probably not understanding your situation as the grease could just be wiped off, or is it stained or something?
--
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wrote:

In airfield lighting, silicone grease is applied to wire insulation for the installation of neoprene insulation sleeves over termination of 5Kv cabling. The cables are now suitable for direct burial or water immersion. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Steve Lusardi wrote:

Thanks Steve--thats 2 or three that I hadn't tried yet---I'll let ya know---Jerry
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It depend on how clean you need the wires. Getting all the silicone grease off can be done using vapor degreasing with trich. But it isn't quick and easy. I would use lots of paper towels to get the wire ends fairly clean.
Dan
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Can you please tell us why you need to remove the grease from ignition wires.
It was put there for a purpose and Ican see no valid reason to remove it unless you want to use the wire for some other purpose and if it is still Hi voltage work? Wots your real problem?
John G.
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The only thing that dissolves silicone is chloroform. It is expensive, but works instantly.
I have used it to dissolve cured RTV silicone caulk and grease.
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wrote:

I was waiting for someone to say Freon or chloroform, because my next question was going to be where to get it. Those are the solvents that are used to disperse high-performance silicones in medical-equipment manufacture and they're both effective. But they're not usually easy to get. Where do you get yours, Ernie?
Depending on the carrier used for the silicone, easier-to-get toluene and xylene often work, and I've found both in paint stores. But my supply is probably 10 years old, and they may not be easy to get these days. I usually use xylene and it cuts most silicones pretty effectively. But if you can get chloroform, and if you follow safety precautions with it, that's probably the most available solvent that's nearly universal. It can kill you, but it works.
-- Ed Huntress
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wrote:

interesting discussion. ya learn something new every day. i gobbed up the trailer plug on my pick up truck w/ silicone grease (to keep out moisture, prevent corrosion). now i'm hoping doing that was ok. thing was though, careful as i was trying to be, that grease got all over, tiny spots. i found it was difficult to get off and once i got it on something it was impossible to make anything (electrical tape, etc.) stick to it. very pesky stuff. had no idea it required special solvents to get it off. i saw a "how it's made" thing on tv about building corvettes, they showed the paint shop, you had to enter it through a clean room. they specifically mentioned silicone as something that REALLY messes up their urethane paint jobs. environmental or ambient (can't think of the proper term, silicone that's out in the world) was something they were battling against. said even a microscopic amount can screw up a corvette's paint job. just interesting trivia. well, so, now that i got miniscule blobs of silicone grease all over my truck, and if i ever am trying to put some paint on it, now i'll know what to use to get it off. thanks.
b.w.
(this is embarrassing, once i worked in a place that made fiber reinforced polyester stuff. we had a fiberglass/silicone mold, the silicone wasn't properly "keyed" to the fiberglass and was flopping around inside the mold. it was ME who came up with the bright idea of using silicone caulk to glue the silicone to the fiberglass. that worked, more or less, but we didn't know that the areas where we gobbed the silicone would somehow permeate through the silicone mold material and retard the cure of the polyester. the polyester cured everywhere except where the silicone was applied to the fiberglass mold. it was a DISASTER and I was responsible for it. it was awful. must've been hundreds of dollars in materials and hundreds of dollars in labor. and that's not to mention cleaning the mold. i don't even know if it ever was successfully cleaned, maybe the silicone caulk destroyed the mold. oy.)
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