SIze of vice

Hi,
If someone is going to give you a 6" vice, how big is it?
In another words, where is the 6" measured?
I'm guessing that it is either between the jaws when they are
fully open or the width of the jaws.
Al
Reply to
Alpinekid
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Alpinekid snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
It depends, of course, on that someone's understanding. But it is common to refer to the jaw width of the vise. A six-inch metal-working or machinist's bench vise is a hefty tool. A six-inch woodworking vise would be on the small side. Frank Morrison
Reply to
Fdmorrison
I recently called an ad in the paper for a "10 inch vise, $50". Guess which way they measured...I didn't even go look at it.
Steve Smith
Alp> Hi,
Reply to
Steve Smith
This is a machinist vice.I use that term loosely. There is no floor post so its not a blacksmith vice and it is not a woodworkers vice. I know what they look like.
The jaws are 3.5" wide but I noticed that they open to a convient 6" before I run out of screw. It seems like a good vice but then I dont know much.
I was surprised at the replaceable jaws. They have a vee-shaped mounting surface and they are held in by 2 pins. Its not going to be easy to make if I want to put some agressive jaws on it. The jaws are smooth face. There is no little points below the jaws for holding pipe and there is no little anvil or pounding table. The jaws close square. It looks like it has not been sprung or bent.
I was just asking so I dont sound so stupid if I gloat over getting a 6" vice and it is really a 3" vice:-)
Al
Reply to
Alpinekid
I cant guess, that is why I'm asking the question. I got this one for $15 so either way I think I did OK. Al
Reply to
Alpinekid
I was laughing over the "floor". That might even be funnier.
Still laughing.........
michael
Hey, what was the sex of the persons doing the measuring? Could be significant..
Reply to
michael
Hi Al:
From your description, this sounds like what I would call a "bench vise". They are usually measured by width of jaws, so that would be a 3.5" vise. In the professional metalworking world (my area), when someone says "I got me a 6" vise" or "6" machinist vise", we tend to immediately think "Kurt vise" (or clone of the same). This is the type of vise designed to bolt (with 2 large bolts) to the table of a milling machine. It has a large flat bottom, and (usually) smooth jaws held on with 2 allen head screws each. The "Kurt" vise is usually measured by jaw width also. 6" is most common. A 6" Kurt weighs about 70 lbs.
Hope this helps,
Joe O.
Joe Osborn
OMW Metalcrafts "Custom Precision Machining in all Metals and Plastics" 23 Pamaron Way, Ste. E. Novato, CA 94949
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EMail: snipped-for-privacy@AOL.COM
Reply to
Joe Osborn
According to my wife..only if its measured to the hair.
Now if you are refering to vise, then it will open to 6"
Reply to
Gunner
Here in the colonies some of us use a vise as a vice:-) I'll bet the colour of our vice is different than the color of my vise. Al
Reply to
Alpinekid
Here is what I think I have learned. I just picked up a 3-1/2" bench vise that should be good for metalworking. The jaws open to 6" when measured to the hair line.
When this vise is viewed from England, the colour of the vice is black:-)
Al
Reply to
Alpinekid
Alpinekid wrote: (clip) The jaws open to 6" when measured to the hair line.(clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^ I have a receding hairline, but it has not affected the size of my tools.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Alpinekid snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
wrt vis(c)e jaws
One more go as straight man.
For a machinist's bench vise, you might consider a pair of liners to fit over both jaws. Even though the jaws have a replaceable steel insert, a brass/bronze liner on top of each jaw (Starrett, etc, makes commercial ones) will act as "soft jaws," for most operations. Unless you need to hammer on the part being held, there's no sense in looking for "agressive" jaws. Even if the liners are loose (the ones in my favorite bench vise are), they will serve well. FM
Reply to
Fdmorrison
Thanks for the help. The replaceable jaws are at a funny angle. Instead of being L shaped at a right angle, the shelf they sit on is less than 90 more like 75 and they are held in place with what looks like a pin instead of bolts. I have to clean it up and get a good look. Most likily I will never remove them. I will just use your idea and add liners when I need to protect the work. I have other vices with teeth on the jaws.
I really want to good blacksmith vice for when I need to pound on something. I always try to get the right tool for the job.
Al
Reply to
Alpinekid
My liners are made from about 12 gage copper salvaged from a transfomer IIRC, put one piece in the vice and hammer form it to the back jaw, same for the front jaw but stamp markit front before taking it out, then drill a hole in each to hang them on a nail near the vice. Mine have lasted many years under moderate use. Opened up copper pipe should work well,1/2" pipe will give you a strip over 1 1/2 inches wide. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller

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