Slotless flathead machine screws?

Awl--
What are they called? Can I find'em in MSC or McM?? If not, any
leads?
I'd hate to have to grind/turn regular flatheads.
Reply to
HoloBarre©®
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I'll bite.. If you don't want a slot, what _do_ you want?
Regards,
Robin
Reply to
Robin S.
A carriage bolt?
Reply to
Lance A Boyle
Maybe he's thinking of stake-in studs? With a little care, you can paint over them and there's no mark on the other side.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
Thinking of plow bolts, maybe?
John Martin
Reply to
JMartin957
Or a sex bolt from MSC.
Doug Goncz I love: Dona, Jeff, Kim, Mom, Neelix, Tasha, and Teri, alphabetically. I drive: A double-step Thunderbolt with 657% range. I fight terrorism by: Using less gasoline.
Reply to
Doug Goncz
Elevator bolts
Reply to
Stephen Young
If you want big ones( 1/2") try any farm co-op.. They're used to hold moldbords and bottoms on plows... hth j
Reply to
j.b. miller
Sex bolt indeed! The plow bolt is the right idea--basically a kind of flat-head carriage bolt. But way too big. I'm looking for 10-32/24 or 1/4-20. The real round-head analogy to the flat head would be "mail box screws." Anyone remember those? :) But it looks like slotless flat heads (for security purposes) are not such a common item. So maybe I'll get brass flat heads and turn them down--this will also give me a smaller "reveal", and look perty nice, as well.
Thanks. ---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll
Reply to
HoloBarre©®
There are also "Elevator Bolts" that have a flat head about 1/16" - 3/32" thick - think a "Carriage Bolt" with the same square shank underhead, but with a flat head instead of a round head.
Used to secure the plywood interior car wall panels to the steel car frame of an elevator, where the flat head can be hidden in a shallow drilled recess in the plywood. This leaves a perfectly flat surface that can be covered with plastic laminate, or a zillion other interior treatments.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
I use a screw similar to these to hold the bed on the miniature runner sleds I make.(see them here:
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) I happened to get these from an estate auction of an electrician. The box is marked Greenlee and are I believe used to hold mounting panels inside electrical boxes. Under the head of these 10-32 X 3/8" screws there are serrations to keep the screw from turning. I haven't found a source for them but will need to soon as I am almost out. Steve Peterson
Reply to
Steve Peterson
Keywords:
These arn'te completely slotless, but they only have two small holes for a special spanner:
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reqTyp=parametric&act=psearch&FAM=machine&FT_110=286&FT_210=51356&session =machine;110=286; 210=51356&sesnextrep=421972617357949&ScreenWidth=1024&McMMainWidth=817
(You'll have to splice this back together)
Alternatively, go to
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& search for flat head "Tamper-Resistant Drilled Spanner" drive screws.
Doug White
Reply to
Doug White
What size does he need? I find, listed in _Machinery's Handbook_, (25th edition), on page 1433 (American National Standard Step and 114 degree countersunk square neck bolts), something which fits your description, other than having a square projection from the bottom of the head to prevent rotation as you tighten a nut on it.
It is shown in sizes from #10 through 3/4", so if that would fit your needs, including the square anti-rotation shank, I think that you have a name (114 degree countersunk square neck bolt).
I have seen smaller ones, with a spline on the neck, so they could be pressed into a countersunk hole and act as studs.
Note that also, in a recently posted URL
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I find flatheads with two small holes (marked "Drilled Spanner"), and two notches from the edges which do not meet in the center (marked "Notched Spanner"), which might also fit your needs -- which are somewhat losely specified, unless you have more detail in another branch of the thread which I have not yet visited.
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Fasteners like this are commonly used on aircraft. The "nut" wrenching element will snap off at a certain torque level leaving a smooth round collar. Standard nuts (fine thread) can be used as well. The bolt is held against the nut wrenching torque by an allen wrench in the hex recess in the shank.
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Reply to
Eric Pederson
Slotless flathead machine screws are widely used on farm machinery, specifically for attaching plowshares and cultivator shovels. They are held against nut tightening torque by a square shank under the head, similar to a carriage bolt. These bolts are not particularly expensive and may be bought by the each in most farm supply stores. They will be in larger sizes, from 3/8" and up, and will probably have coarse threads. Pat
Reply to
JWDoyleJr
THose are specifically called "plow bolts."
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
No, that's really what a slotless flat head screw in 10-32 or 10-24 or 1/4 - 20 is called. It's called a sex bolt, MSC sells them at mscdirect.com and you buy them with matching *round head* slotless mating nuts. In operation it's a lot like a paper clamp screw for binding paper with holes drilled in it.
Honest.
These *are* a security item. For permanent assemblies.
Doug Goncz I love: Dona, Jeff, Kim, Mom, Neelix, Tasha, and Teri, alphabetically. I drive: A double-step Thunderbolt with 657% range. I fight terrorism by: Using less gasoline.
Reply to
Doug Goncz
There are also tamper proof screws that are slotless and without spanner holes. They have a very slightly oval shaped head that will engage a mating driver. They aren't cheap, but work quite well and look nice.
Reply to
Jim Stewart

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