Suggestions Rust suppression in tools and tables and lathe beds

Hi all
This is a mixed metal and wood tool question but it still seems the best place to ask is here
I'm looking for a way to store tools to make them rust resistant. My
lathe came with over 40 pounds of tool steel in the form of toolbits. I know in general HSS is fairly rust resistant but because I'm by no means a production shop my tools get a few hours a week of use tops and some can sit for months without being touched (some of the tool steel hasn't left its box because i've had plenty)
Living in Canada means that Condensation is a problem. It might not be the tropics but high humidity and temperature swings means that my tolls are, whether i like it or not, in a place where they are exposed to a lot of moisture and possible condensation. I clued when i noticed there was a thin coat of rust on my scrollsaw's bed (Steel or cast iron not quite sure but bare metal.) The lathe is under a thin cover of 30 weight oil so i'm not too worried about it but if there was a drier way of rustproofing it i'd be all over it
I'm looking for suggestions for two things
1. A non oily table/bed coating to suppress rust (Non oily so that wood and metal machines can use it)
2. And ideas to coat tools as a preventative measure to stop them from rusting it isnt Always Practical to store them in airtight containers with Dessicant bags.
Any tool i buy i buy with the intention of using it essentially forever (Decades) without abuse.
Any opinions are welcome i'm sure i'm not the only person who has Issues like this and i'm sure some people here have owned the same machines for longer than i've been alive and kept them in perfect condition.
Thanks
Brent Ottawa Canada
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Brent wrote:

You can get waxes for tools like tablesaws that won't interfere with use, most of the woodworking suppliers have something for that. Boeshield and Slip-It are two such.
For things like garden tools exposed to outside atmosphere in storage, I use the LPS line. This can be somewhat hard to find, LPS Labs seems to be concentrating on industrial users rather than small and hobby shop users. I use LPS 3 for long-term storage, LPS 2 for shorter term storage. LPS 3 leaves a waxy coating, kind of like spray-on cosmoline. LPS 2 is a thinner material that can be wiped on or off. LPS 3 can be removed using LPS 2 or mineral spirits. One US supplier is www.mscdirect.com, I've found spray cans in selected Ace hardware stores, too. Remove rust first, then apply. LPS 1 can help remove rust, it's the penetrant of the line.
If you've got a real condensation problem, store your tooling in surplus ammo cans with dessicant packs. Ammo cans can be had in a lot of different sizes, one 20mm can I've got is about 3' high and wide. They're all designed to be air- and water- tight.
If you've got tool chests, look for VPI tabs. One or two in each compartment will help prevent rust, they give off a vapor that displaces air and water vapor. Need to be changed out every year or so. These are the same things that come in the boxes with calipers and micrometers, usually look like a 1/2" disc of cardboard. Some are square, some are round.
Stan
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snipped-for-privacy@prolynx.com wrote:

I bought some camphor on ebay that comes in roughly 1" square by 1/4" blocks, individually wrapped (in a pound box). I put one in each drawer, inside a small plastic bag with a small slit cut in it. They seem to work fine.
Steve
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On 5 Oct 2006 14:17:38 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@prolynx.com wrote:

Excellent post!
You did however leave out "tool dip"
Gunner
"If I'm going to reach out to the the Democrats then I need a third hand.There's no way I'm letting go of my wallet or my gun while they're around."
"Democrat. In the dictionary it's right after demobilize and right before demode` (out of fashion). -Buddy Jordan 2001
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Brent wrote:

Three suggestions in addition:
Condensation isn't necessary. You can deal with moisture, there are dehumidifiers available. Electric ones are good (you do have to drain the water somehow), and dessicant chemicals can be used in a pinch. Calcium sulphate(?) is rebake-able. Some folk even keep heaters on the important areas of a shop (lots of welding rod has a light bulb burning nearby, and not for a nightlight).
Old tools commonly survived with nothing more than a film of oil, but it was gummy boiled linseed oil. Doesn't hurt a wood finish, really. It mainly rubs off the metal, but leaves a glaze.
If/when you need to remove rust or use degreasers, a little washing (to remove salt from fingerprints) and polish (wax and a buffer) will help. I like to follow rust removal with piling small items on a hotplate, and when they're fully warm, I pick them off and rub down with a parafin-wax impregnated shop rag. A thin film of wax comes off onto the hot item. When the rag gets dry, just hold a block of paraffin on the next hot item then rub the item down with the rag.
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HTC sells tool covers that are waterproof, but can "breathe" so condensation does not build up inside.
Boeshield is a special spray to protect metal from rusting. It was developed for aircraft.
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I live in rust and humidity central (Florida East coast, on a salt bayou called the Banana River). Rust is so bad here that spring stock will rust inside sealed plastic bags. In addition my hands are sufficiently acid that I can rust blued steel just thinkng about touching it. That said, I use LPS 3 for long term storage, Birchwood Casey's Sheath for blued steel, and Midway's Tipton Rust Guard aerosol spray:
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid $8829
The other stuff is available from most gun stores. I use machine covers sold by HF - a green vinyl outer fabric with a cotton felt like material on the inside, and always spray the machine down with Rust Guard after use. I open any plastic bags gun springs come in and spray Birchwood-Casey's Sheath on the steel. Blued steel gets a wipe down with liquid Sheath before storage. I have an old surplus metal spotting scope box with a gasketed lid that I use to store my arc welding rods. It has two 25W light bulbs wired in series to keep the moisture down - I have stored rods for years and they are still good.
Hope this helps.....Joel in Florida
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