Following on from 'Rust in Workshop'

Hi all.
Thanks for all the replies about rust in my workshop. I'll have a good think
of what next to do to rid the rust.
No-one picked up upon the question about how I can get rid of the rust on
the bed of the milling machine. Although I sprayed the machine vey well
with WD40, the bed has become quite rusty. Would it be safe to use very
fine wet'n'dry or steel wool to clean it up? I'm sure the rust is only
superficial. Strangely, the lathe bed (Myford) isn't rusty at all ! Could
that be the difference between Iron and Steel?
Incidentally, Dave is my name, Brad is my nickname.
Cheers.
Reply to
Brad.
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it's gone rusty because of the wd40
you used way oil on your lathe
you used wd40 on your mill
so wipe the mill down with hydraulic oil ...hydraulic is the same as way oil without the tackfiers .
wd 40 will hold moisture ...
you can use scotch bright to clean your mill.
or 00 wire wool
all the best...markj
Reply to
mark
it's gone rusty because of the wd40
you used way oil on your lathe
you used wd40 on your mill
so wipe the mill down with hydraulic oil ...hydraulic is the same as way oil without the tackfiers .
wd 40 will hold moisture ...
you can use scotch bright to clean your mill.
or 00 wire wool
all the best...markj
Cheers for that, I really appreciate your advise. It makes sense about WD40 and the amount of condensation in the workshop sending tings rusty. I'm not so worried now. Many thanks. Brad.
Reply to
Brad.
Hmm, first time I've ever heard that said about WD40, considering that it was designed primarily as a water dispersant for electrical circuits etc. In fact it's first use was in the USA space/defence programme as a water displacer and corrosion inhibitor...
Now I don't normally suggest that people read Wikipeadia, do to the gross unreliability of the facts contained within (due to the policy of allowing anyone edit without first proving their knowledge) but this brief page on WD-40 is very close to the fact that have been known for over 40 years -
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I suppose what might be the problem is the cheapo imitations that are around that claim to have some of the same properties as WD-40, many of these do indeed contain a high degree of water as they are not actually marketed as water displacers, being just penetrating oils instead. The other problem is, as Trevor has pointed out, WD-40 is very good at removing other oils too...
Reply to
:Jerry:
I think the problem lies in the fact that as WD-40 is a water dispersant, it seems to do this by forming a solution/mixture/emulsion with the water, everything else evaporates fast leaving just the water behind.
I use WD-40 only when I need a solvent, not a lubricant - locally (Australia) we use RP-3 as a longer term thin lubricant (locks, firearms etc where powdered graphite won't always do the job). I wipe off the WD-40 after it's done the job & lubricate with oil, or spray with lanoguard (lanoline spray) if I need to prevent ways rusting.
Reply to
Duracell Bunny
No, it doesn't leave the water behind, if it did that it wouldn't be a water dispersant!
I only use WD-40 when I want to remove water from hard to reach areas, when I need a solvent I use a solvent ...The problem with WD-40 and rusting is because the solvent it contains also removes any oil that is coating the part, if you need to protect from corrosion after dispersing water you need to either recoat with oil or some other sealing agent.
Reply to
:Jerry:
What about using 3 in 1 oil? Pete
Reply to
pete
I use Scotchbrite (pan scourers) to clean off the rust and oil it after.Cheers
Reply to
Nourish
Just how much money can you afford to burn? Waste? Throw away?
Work out the cost per liter of that stuff!
Read the label. The stuff I have says that it's 20 weight oil.
Buy a liter of non-detergent oil and save yer coin for tools.
Cheers Trev
Reply to
Trevor Jones
You are 10 days late for April first
Cliff Coggin.
Reply to
Cliff Coggin
Dave, as Mark said earlier, you can use scotchbrite pads to get rid of the rust. Avaialble in several different grades from fairly abrasive to non-abrasive 'polishing' grade. Have a look at the J&L site and type scotchbrite in for the search.
For rust prevention of tooling in medium or longer term storage, I can happily recommend a product which although quite expensive, is very effective indeed.
In the injection moulding business we spray all the working surfaces of our *extremely* expensive mould tools with a moisture guard product when they come out the machine and before they go onto the storage racks. Bear in mind these mould tools often have a very high diamond polished surface finish, and a 0.2mm diameter spot of rust can mean a rejected part and an expensive re-polish of the tool, so the stuff we use has to be 100% effective. The products we use are made by either Ambersil or Rocol, and these spray a thin waxy film over the surface that displaces and repels water and totally prevents rust. We have some mould tools stored outside in a 20ft container for 2years, where the outside of the tool rusted, but the working surfaces were as bright as new.
Links here: Ambersil
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Rocol
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Not cheap, but a single can goes quite a long way, and compared to the many £000's that a mould tool costs, a cheap solution for us.
Peter
Reply to
Peter Neill
As poor quality varnish goes I do find it exceptionally slow drying....
Richard
Reply to
Richard
for the ultimate protection ....
they don't tout this with their product
back to black silicone spray ... it works very very well as a rust protectant
but has side effects ... they are ... if you ever do any painting in your workshop .......it will prevent paint sticking to any surface ........even in the minutest quantities.
the stuff will coat every surface in the workshop (from the mist drift) .....so can get on to all metals ...unknowingly ...preventing you painting them properly in the future.
think that's why you don't see these polymer silicone sealants for cars on the market anymore ...think the auto industry outlawed them ...because ...they were having failing results with insurance jobs
so if you don't do any painting ...or plan to ..........you can use the stuff.
all the best.....markj
Reply to
mark
think that's why you don't see these polymer silicone sealants for cars on the market anymore ...think the auto industry outlawed them ...because ...they were having failing results with insurance jobs
Oh YES they do... :~(((((((((((((
You're not doing to well in this thread, are you!
Reply to
:Jerry:
Heres one you may not know about ,Lanolin its very good at protecting against rust good for timber also some say for the skin but experience has shown me at least one who was alergic to it , the old mixture of steam cylinder oil mixed with a little kero is a good long term protector.
Reply to
olmod
meaning that i must have done well on other threads .so will take that as a compliment ...thank you .
aha ...the infamous tony morgan or rhyl-on-line ... strikes again .
haven't you got a good word for anyone
and why hide behind a disguise .
the outlawed info passed on to me by a painter friend ...
the stuff is not liked by car sprayers ..
yes you can still get the stuff .....but not as readily available as it used to be . .
all the best.......mark
Reply to
mark
meaning that i must have done well on other threads .so will take that as a compliment ...thank you .
aha ...the infamous tony morgan or rhyl-on-line ... strikes again .
haven't you got a good word for anyone
and why hide behind a disguise .
the outlawed info passed on to me by a painter friend ...
the stuff is not liked by car sprayers ..
yes you can still get the stuff .....but not as readily available as it used to be . .
all the best.......mark
Well one out of five is not bad.
I'm not sure if you have been correct in any other thread so can't comment but considering your comments in this thread I'm not holding much hope...
I'm not Tony Morgan (what ever did happen to him, he just vanished one day - mid discussion IIRC)...
I'm not in disguise, I've been posting as the same person for the last 9 years (spam traps don't count), and where I have changes 'username' to it's been clearly flagged...
Nothing has been 'outlawed' (I can't think of a single product that has been banned, no wait, - there are two that come to mind - Carbon tetra-chloride (sp?) based brake cleaner and solvent based paint), I suspect that what your 'friend' meant was that any product that contains silicon has been 'outlawed' from the paint-shop that he works in (as it will have been in any paint-shop)...
Agreed, auto-painter sprayers don't like silicon, wow you got that one right!
Wrong, many auto' products that contain silicon are still available off the shelf in Halfords etc. - even the mentioned "Back to Black" - even worse are those 'Colour-back' and 'Glass shine' silicon sealers (waxes) for car paint work...
Reply to
:Jerry:
protecting
experience
And another little known fact: historically the major source of lanolin was the sewers of Bradford, where the wool trade would wash wool and the wool lanolin would be in the wash water. Does Bradford still have a wool trade or have we lost that as well as everything else?
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Did you also know that the Esholt (Bradford) sewage works, a very large site, had (has?) its own railway system and had at least one but ISTR two steam locos which were fired on recovered 'wool grease'?
Cheers
Tim
Reply to
Tim Leech
If the peoples of third world countries can use camel dung as a cooking fuel, is there any reason why the human equivalent can't be used to fire those locos in the sewage works? The fuel would be free but I can't say I fancy being a stoker there.
Cliff Coggin.
Reply to
Cliff Coggin

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