Telescoping tube?

I cut crimped steel wire in an automatic machine of my design and
construction. The lengths range from 5" to 9". The wire is "roped" to
up to 600 strands then wound on a 20" wood reel. Some of these ropes
get tangled between the pushing arm and the funnel at the cutting blades.
I have tried to use an expansion spring and I might just get that to
work if I hit on the magic dimensions for the spring. I'm thinking of
something like a telescoping tube that would range from 1" long to 9"
long with an ID of 1" to 1-1/2". (Where is that Unobtanium and
Dissapearium when I need it?)
Ever seen a telescoping tube like that?
Reply to
Tom Gardner
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Pretty common in the aircraft industry.
It's usually 4130 .049 wall, but there are a lot of sizes to play with.
Reply to
Richard
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McMaster carries a limited selection.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
WINNER! We HAVE a WINNER! Thanks Ned, the third link looks so cool, I've never seen such a thing.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Look up "volute spring", have been around for hundreds of years. Kind of a specialty item these days with coiled wire springs readily available, but were used in a lot of places like in British railway car buffers.. Probably was easier to roll up a sheet of steel than to hammer or roll out round bar stock and coil it up.
Stan
Reply to
stans4
Volute springs can be wound so there's tight contact between the turns. The resulting friction is what makes them better dampers than coil springs. "Friction springs" are an interesting alternative to volute springs, or hydraulic shocks, and also use friction to absorb kinetic energy.
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Reply to
Ned Simmons
Ned Simmons wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Thanks! I'd never seen these before. I have no idea if I would ever find a use for them, but it's a slick idea. That takes care of my "learn something new every day" quota.
Doug White
Reply to
Doug White
Vehicle leaf springs slide against each other to absorb energy and dampen rebound.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins

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