The Metallurgy of Silver Vintage Mining mines 1899 FA

The Metallurgy of Silver ,A Practical Treaise on the Almalgamation and
Lixibation of Silver ores Including the Assaying,melting & Refining of
Silver Bullion by M Eissler 1899 , couple of ink stamps from original
owner (Bwllfa & Merthyr Dare Steam Collieries,1891 )slight wear to
extremities ,surface fabric at base of spine otherwise a very good
copy. 336 pages plus section of period mine related advertising.
Very scarce item,packed with illustrations,hugely comprehensive . We
also have it's companion volume The Metallurgy of Gold for sale (see
our other auctions).
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Reply to
JaneyP
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Hhmmmnnn ! Does this book really exist ? The phrase "Lixibation" is not found in the English dictionery. Maybe they meant to say, "lixiviation", meaning "to leach".
Bob (always skeptical about stuff on ebay) Swinney
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Reply to
Robert Swinney
I'm very much interested in the subject but was looking for something written this century that addresses modern methods, environment, safety, etc.
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Reply to
Ben
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Likely a spelling error. From google books
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Wes S
Reply to
clutch
The extraction of silver from ores bears little in common with refining. That's not to say you couldn't be enlightened by the book, but it likely will have little content that is "how to" where refining is involved. It's not a well published field, and what little you'll discover is likely to be information beyond that which would help you to learn the refining process.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
Doesn't the concentrating/smelting process depend on what type of ore? ie oxides vs sulfides? I have property in old silver mining country and some of the good ores went 900 oz to the ton and were fluxed via galena without any concentration.
The lower grades were concentratedt in floatation cells then smelted. I think those old miners were really just a bunch of mad chemists...
ED
Reply to
ED
snip----
Indeed it does. Oxidized ores can be directly reduced by smelting----unlike sulfide ores. It is normal practice to oxidize sulfide ores by roasting to liberate the sulfur. That was the source of SO2 in the air when I was a boy, living in Midvale, Utah, where a silver and lead smelter ran until the late 50's.
The value of the galena in your ore was for the resulting lead to act as a collector (after roasting to oxidize the ore) of the silver, assuring a good recovery of silver from the gangue. That was pretty much the accepted practice in the old days. Molten lead acts as a solvent, dissolving silver and other elements well below their melting temperatures. Needless to say, it became a part of the values when metals were marketed.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos

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