Turning - Cutting Lubricant / Coolant

I recently picked up a PM1440 lathe and I noted it has a coolant tank and pump so that I can run a continuous stream on a cut. I see this used all
the time on enclosed CNC lathes, but how many of you guys are using something like this on your manual lathes? In the past I have just used a few drops of Tap Magic (all metals formula) for turning most things, and some stuff I got in an old free oil can that smells like bug poison for really hard stuff like metal and tubing bending rollers.
While the lathe is intended to make money I just don't see me running it continuously every day. More along the lines of -> when all the CNC mills are cutting and the CAM for the next jobs is done I'll make some other parts on the lathe. I may only use it a few days a week. So coolant sitting on the tank will dry up. I can always add water if I used a water soluble coolant of course, but...
Then there is the other thing. The mess. I can see this sort of application throwing coolant everywhere, and there is no shield over the cutting tool. Just over the chuck. On an enclosed CNC lathe its no big deal. It hits the door and runs down into the splash pan, but on an open manual lathe I can just see me being soaked and the tank being empty in no time. Any experience? Suggestions?
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wrote:

It is probably heresy but I worked at Edwards AFB machine shop in about 1970 and no one used coolant, or cutting oil for that matter. In fact I spent some ten years in A.F. machine shops and don't remember anyone ever using cutting oil or coolant, except for rare instances like reaming a hole.
I suspect that techniques were different then. One selected a speed and feed to turn a light brown chip if reducing diameters was the intent and a sort of rule of thumb was the maximum depth of cut was about the size of the tool bit. i.e. a quarter inch tool bit could cut about a 1/4" deep cut.
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So, just out of curiosity.... how much horsepower did you have at your disposal? That's some serious cutting.
I know enough to stay aggressive with stainless (and spring steels), but that's really about if for me. Sure I've turned just about everything I could fit in my lathe in the past, but its all shade tree machining with a dose of broken tools for good measure. This machine will cut about 70% aluminum, 25% stainless, and 5% misc steels from hot rolled to 4140 prehard as needed. Maybe a small amount of Peek and Acetal plastic.
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wrote:

I don't have a clue. A lathe came with am electric motor and that was what got used, for the life of the machine.

Well, you can certainly cut all of those without cooling or lube oil.
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John B.
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On a manual machine you are there baby sitting it so you constantly adjust the aim of the nozzle. Coolant on the chuck will put it everywhere, coolant on where the tool meets the work will keep it under control.
My speeds and feeds were always slower on my manual lathe too. That helped keep the throwing of coolant down to minimum.
I would guess the tank dried up on that machine by now I only use it for simple small stuff, everything goes in the turning center now.
wrote:

Remove 333 to reply. Randy
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'Got a Bijur with a modified nozzle and atomizer so that it sprays coarser droplets than the original true "mist", so it doesn't become airborne.
It works a treat on every machine, and cools 'adequately' on everything but really heavy cuts in tough materials.
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

You use the SC520 for that too?
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Yes, I do. Lloyd
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