Cutting oil or coolant for drill press

A company gave me this drill press.
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I will actually use it instead of scrapping, and my question is, is it
better to use soluble coolant, or cutting oil on it.
thanks
Reply to
Ignoramus10622
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Your question is filled with variables.
Material to be drilled? Drill RPM? Feed rate? Do you want to cool the drill or lubricate it?
Best Regards Tom.
Reply to
Howard Beel
On Sep 18, 2017, Ignoramus10622 wrote (in article):
It isn?t that critical, unless you are cutting something like stainless steel (use heavy cutting oil like Mobilmet). I use Rustlick WS-5050 soluble oil for just about everything. Use a fairly concentrated solution to prevent undue rusting and staining of iron surfaces.
Joe
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
Tom, honestly I do not know, it will be a shop drill press for everything. We do not manufacture anything (though I have an idea to make phase converters). Mostly it will be used for regular steel.
Reply to
Ignoramus10622
OK, i would go with oil. That what i use, don't have to worry about rusting or staining of parts.
Best Regards Tom.
Reply to
Howard Beel
thanks, i will get cutting oil
Reply to
Ignoramus10622
Then use cutting oil from a precision oiler.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
It really depends on what you will use it for and how often. I use my drill presses every day, but I still don't feel its often enough to setup a coolant system on them. A few holes, a few threads, next... I've found that unless I am doing heavy drilling a single drop of Tap Magic is enough to lubricate my cuts. A pint bottle by the drill press area lasts a very long time. Even given that its hard to get just one drop. If I am doing heavy drilling I use a heavier oil, but still only a few drops at a time unless it?s a hole down inside a blind cavity so that I can contain a little more oil. On the other hand... I'm not a real machinist. Probably 50% of what I know I learned from the guys in this group.
Something to think about though. One of the old members of this groups uses the same soluble coolant for just about everything. Turning, milling, drilling, etc. But on the lathe and the drill press he dips a cup out of the tank on the mill and applies it with a brush.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Nice drill station. I keep looking at those. It would sure be nice to have one of those with about 5 heads in the shop somedays.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
For general purpose drilling of a few small holes in typical materials, brushing on a little cutting oil each hole makes the least mess.
For really serious drilling of large holes in tough materials, then flood coolant will make sense. So, it totally depends on what you will use it for.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
Joe - water mixed with 1 part Borax, ie Mule Team from the local grocery, to 100 parts water eliminated rust on several occasions. Now, the 100 to 1 is by weight but that's one misty memory. A test with a 1000 to 1 solution showed rust.
Hul
Joseph Gw> On Sep 18, 2017, Ignoramus10622 wrote
Reply to
Hul Tytus
On Sep 19, 2017, Hul Tytus wrote (in article ):
That is a traditional recipe. I?m pretty sure that WS-5050 does the same thing. Their instructions are pretty clear about the needed concentration, and that simply topping off with water as the water evaporates from the mix won?t maintain full performance. I just replace the entire reservoir full from time to time.
Iggy decided to go to oil, which is very reliable. I don?t use circulating oil to keep the mess down.
Joe
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
Wow! How much does that thing weigh? Looks like a minimum of 5000 lbs. I doubt that I have the power to spin up one of those three motors. :-)
Hmm ... the table has the gutter to feed to a tank and pump. I see why you wanted to know. I think that the soluble coolant would be better -- especially one with the anti-fungus additives to keep it from turning into a nasty smell source -- and possible source of infections.
But take the advice of others not me. I'm not experienced in using a machine of that scale.
I am interested to know whether the two jackscrews under the table are geared together (chain drive, perhaps?) or can they be adjusted separately to tilt the table for some weird project needs.
I presume that there is a lubrication pump, too, and that ofn course wants the proper oil (likely listed on the reservoir.)
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
I think that it is perhaps 4000
S>> thanks
I have Hangsterfer S500 in my CNC mill, it does not smell bad, but I have some issues such as a film of oily snot at the top of the liquid.
Reply to
Ignoramus31910
O.K. Still pretty impressive.
O.K. There are devices advertised in MSC and elsewhere called "Tramp oil skimmers" which may help with this. Not too expensive, compared to the machines themselves.
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
For your needs, used motor oil will be perfect!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
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Used motor oil may contain heavy metals like lead from the bearing shells and combustion byproducts suspected of causing cancer.
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"It is difficult to ascribe observed health effects in epidemiological studies to specific PAHs because most exposures are to PAH mixtures."
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I think that Tom was being his funny/facetious self. d8-)
I'm wondering what Iggy is going to drill with a heavy-duty, three-head production drilling machine.
Is he going into competition with Caterpillar?
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Tom has a great sense of humor. I am windering if I can just use hydraulic oil for cutting. I have large quantities of it and even burn it for winter.
Reply to
Ignoramus4881
If you're asking me, I have no clue. And if you called a hydraulic oil company and talked to their top engineer, I'm reasonably sure they would have no clue, either.
If you want to talk about what properties you want in a cutting oil or other cutting fluid, I can offer the basics. But it's a tedious subject and I'm not going off on it unless you want to get into it.
Reply to
Ed Huntress

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