using a wire wheel brush with an angle grinder

Hi, I got a DeWalt DW402 4.5" angle grinder with a 5/8" arbor. My
wire brush with a 5/8" hole will mount OK but there's a catch. The
edge of the brush flares out to be about 1" thick. That being so, the
brush brushes against the grinder chasis itself. If I use any
combination of the spacers that came with the grinder, the wheel hole
lines up in thread territory and I can no longer center the wheel.
The vibration is awful. The wheel came with a 1/2 poly washer adapter
but that's not the solution here. It seems the arbor needs more
length before the arbor thread starts. Does anyone make an adapter
that will remedy this?
--zeb
Reply to
zeb7k
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can you use a cup shaped brush?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus25220
Is this a cup-type brush or a flat saucer-like brush?
The answer is never to move the brush out along the arbor, never. Doesn't your brush thread onto the arbor directly?
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
It sounds like you have a wire brush intended for a stationary bench grinder, not a handheld angle grinder. For a handheld angle grinder you should be using a cup type brush which normally has a threaded hub that threads directly onto the grinder spindle without any nuts or spacers.
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
They make a different type of wheel, with a 5/8 nut welded to one side. Just thread it onto the spindle and go. The nut both centers the wheel and spaces it out far enough so that it doesn't rub. Sounds like you got a wire wheel for a bench grinder...
--Glenn Lyford
Reply to
glyford
Also, a wire brush intended for a stationary bench grinder likely has an RPM limit much lower than one for an angle grinder and may fail catastrophically if spun at the 10,000 + RPM of an angle grinder vs. the 1,750 - 3,600 RPM of a bench grinder.
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
Wrong brush. For a plain arbor, get a "Cable "twist. Or, get a threaded arbor standard twist. Or get a "stringer Bead" brush. Don't space a brush on a mini. You'll have less problems and do a better job with a domestic brush.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
beginning to think the "handle" should be "stryped"... possibly trolling..... Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
Nope, any 4" knot type brush will be rated at least 15,000 RPM. Mine are certified at 25,000 RPM. There's no distinction between plain arbor brush and one with a threaded arbor. However, most people don't realize that higher speed isn't always better for the job. At some point the brush stops cutting and just burnishes. Brushes are matched to jobs by "Surface feet per minute".
Reply to
Tom Gardner
I'm referring to the saucer-like brush.
Reply to
zeb7k
Pray tell, what is "stryped"?
Reply to
zeb7k
Only use threaded center wire brushes.
Gunner
Rule #35 "That which does not kill you, has made a huge tactical error"
Reply to
Gunner
You don't really want to know, but if you stay around here long enough you will get the chance to read one of his postings :)
Don't let it bother you, some of the guys just have a short tolerance span and can't keep quiet about it...
Reply to
Leon Fisk
of course manufacturers overrate the rpm speed of their brushes (Osbourne and others) . When you drive a wirebrush too fast it breaks the wires off faster with no additional work performed, therefore you need to buy more brushes.
Tony
Reply to
Tony
Oh, no, no, no! It costs thousands of bucks per brush to certify the speed. It's an ANSI/ISO spec. The rated speed stamped on the brush has nothing to do with the best speed for the brushing operation. That's trial and error with a bit of intuitive insight and experience. If wires are breaking off, you're doing something wrong. Unless it's an import.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
I was wire-brushing components of my Burke mill yesterday. When I got done the front of my jacket looked like a porcupine. Time for a new wheel. Tom, I'll try to call you next week.
Rex B
Reply to
Rex B

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