Using oil emulsion cutting fluid for hand tapping

A small discovery. I've tried all manner of tapping lubricants over the
years, and they all sort-of worked. Well, worked better than tapping
dry. What works better than anything else I've tried, at least for
aluminum, is Rustlick WS-5050 emulsion of chlorinated paraffin in water.
Given that I have this stuff in my coolant pump, I always have a gallon
on hand. I just flood the area, and proceed. This while using a
piloted tap wrench in the drill press (or mill).
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
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Out of curiosity -- what metals are you tapping with this? I would expect it to work well on a steel -- especially a tough steel, but I'm not sure that it would be any better than kerosene or WD-40 (if as good) on aluminum alloys.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
So this is using your coolant concentrate full strength on the tap? That's pretty cool!
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
Where "paraffin" means more or less kerosene. Nasty stuff.
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Reply to
Richard J Kinch
Not so fast there. The term "chlorinated paraffin" (CAS 63449-39-8) covers the range C10 to C30 (10 carbon atoms to 30 carbon atoms in the molecule), while SCCP (Short Chain Chlorinated Paraffin) covers the range C10 to C13. So C14 to C30 is OK.
See
for more information. CAS 63449-39-8 is the term for chlorinated paraffin wax, not chlorinated kerosene.
Nor is ITW going to let their best-seller WS-5050 slip away, if all that's needed is to use the long-chain stuff.
The stuff in WS-5050 is greasy on the hands, versus a light oil like kerosene. And chlorine (and/or sulfur) is required for a heavy cutting fluid to work.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
No, I'm using the water emulsion, although I would assume that the concentrate works too.
WS-5050 is sold as a tapping fluid, so the discovery is that it works better than the more expensive specialized tapping fluids.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
Aluminum, 5025 or 2025 alloy to be precise.
I'll be trying in in 1018 steel soon enough.
My impression is that WS-5050 worked better in aluminum than kerosene or alcohol. Or Tap Magic.
I bet one can dissolve WS-5050 concentrate in kerosene, and it might be useful.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
O.K.
Hmm ... the *original* Tap Magic was a *very* bad choice with aluminum. Purple smoke, rust on the tap, and discoloration on the aluminum. :-)
Perhaps so. Or it *might* even *have* some kerosene in it. :-)
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
My understanding is that the CAS number is qualified as short chain, not waxy, paraffins.
Nevertheless, the word "paraffin" here means an alkane, not wax. Kerosene is a blend largely of paraffins in this sense.
See:
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Reply to
Richard J Kinch
As mentioned in my prior posting, see
for more information. In the facts column to the right, CAS 63449-39-8 is the term for chlorinated paraffin (or hydrocarbon) *wax*, the implication being that longer chains are used.
I fail to see the relevance. We have a CAS number, which is far more precise than the general word "paraffin".
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
You're right about the CAS number. My comment about the term "paraffin" stands.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch

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