Wikipedia article on steel

Something just rubs me the wrong way on this article. They say steel is iron with between 0.2 and 2.1% carbon. SAE 1010 steel has only
0.10% carbon so their start point is too high. and I was always taught steel has a max of 1.0% carbon. Am I wrong?
Anyone here a member of wikipedia and can officailly ask?
From what I've read cast iron starts at 2.1% carbon and above, so maybe that's why they list it that way. Otherwise what would you call something with greater than 1.0 and less than 2.1% carbon?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/16/2011 11:39 AM, Randy333 wrote:

I think the term is fuzzy, so you have to fall back on the linguist's interpretation: if it's commonly called 'steel', it's steel. Note that you need to pay attention to different language groups, though -- if there's a firm population of technical types that consider anything less than 0.2% to be "iron" and not "steel", then more power to them -- but don't let that keep you from calling your steel supplier and ordering 1010 'steel'.

Brittle and weird.
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So, if rolled aluminum is commonly referred to as "Billet" is that then the name for it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You really don't want to get this group started on the meaning of "billet." I still have the scars from the last time. d8-)
--
Ed Huntress



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/16/2011 11:59 AM, Cross-Slide wrote:

If that's the only name that'll wrench it out of your suppliers hands, and you need some to make $$ off a customer, are you going to tell them you want sheet?
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim Wescott wrote:

Or just tell them to bill-it to your account. ;-)
It was fun buying electrical supplies when I moved south. They had local names for everything, and had no clue what the OEM names meant. They were adverse to a list of OEM stock numbers, as well.
--
You can't fix stupid. You can't even put a Band-Aid on it, because it's
Teflon coated.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/16/2011 04:37 PM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

That's interesting. When I lived in Massachusetts for a while I'd go into supply places and I'd say "Back in Oregon we called this a flognozzle*, but I don't know what you guys call this here". They'd grin and say "Oh yea, that's a blogflorgle** -- I got one right here".
* "T-nut", "reducer", "Romex", etc. ** see above
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim Wescott wrote:

They call a standard stamped steel outlet box a 'Handibox'. I needed some TFFN wire to replace a damaged wiring harness for a TV transmitter in the Florida panhandle. At first the local distributor refused to deal with me, even though I had an account at a different branch. I smiled and told him that was fine, that I would wait till Saturday when I would be in Orlando and pick it up, and have the manager contact corporate to file my written complaint. He nearly filled his pants and looked like he was going to faint. Then I found that they only stocked Blue, Brown and White and only 14 AWG.
Other times I had to take the OEM catalog with pictures to show them what I needed. When I lived up north, you asked for EMT. Down here it's a 'Stick of pipe'. They thought Romex was a brand name, so they had several other names for it.
--
You can't fix stupid. You can't even put a Band-Aid on it, because it's
Teflon coated.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 17 May 2011 15:00:55 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

Romex is a brand name, you want type NM cable.
So is Kleenex.
Remove 333 to reply. Randy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Randy333 wrote:

So was Formica.

See above.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gunner Asch wrote:

I once saw a label on a dumpster, identifying itself as a "Dempster Dumpmaster;" it seems Wiki has left out that little detail. Hmmm... maybe I should go tell Wiki. ;-)
Cheers! Rich
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gunner Asch wrote:

After 20 or 30 years, a lot of tradmarks seem to become generic. Just like the very bad ideas that some politicans keep recycling.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ordinary steels max at around 1%, but, for example, music wire can run up over 1.2%
In theory, you get maximum hardness from martensite conversion (the basic hardening mechanism for carbon steel) at 0.7%. But that assumes perfect mixtures of iron and carbon. In fact, you can get greater hardness up to around 1.2%, or even a little more -- up to close to 2% -- if your only hardening occurs by drawing. For example, music wire.
There are some other specialty steels that run up to 2%.
There are graded carbon steels, such as 1008, that run as low as 0.08%. Before we had HSLA steels, that was auto-body sheet metal. Below that, and you have soft iron. Commerically, if it has a lot of silicon added, it's "magnetic iron," which was used for motor and transformer laminations. It probably still is.
Above 2%, and you have some very cranky steel that's better classed as iron. If it has impurities in it, it's pig iron or cast iron (same thing).

I'm not official, but I was Materials Editor for _American Machinist_. I'm no expert and I know little chemistry, but I did have to study the hell out of it at one time.
--
Ed Huntress

>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 16 May 2011 15:09:01 -0400, "Ed Huntress"

Just curious, what is an example?
52100 is the highest carbon content I know of.
Remove 333 to reply. Randy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Plain-carbon straight razors. <g> Sorry I don't know of anything more recent. That was in a book I read about steel, and it was printed some time in the '30s.
IIRC, early surgical scalpels also were made of carbon steel of very high carbon content, well above the amount in AISI/SAE graded steels.

Music wire traditionally has been made from proprietary, small-crucible melts, and can run well over 1.2%. It's some version of electrode-remelt today, either vacuum-arc remelt (VAR) or electroslag remelt.
You're testing my memory. I haven't read or written about most of this for close to 30 years.
--
Ed Huntress



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Several other statements in that article are questionable.
" Steel is also distinguishable from wrought iron, which can contain a small amount of carbon, but it is included in the form of slag inclusions." He later states that carbon is soluble in the metal.
"Two distinguishing factors are steel's increased rust resistance and better weldability." Better than wrought iron??
"Iron is extracted from ore by removing oxygen and combining the ore with a preferred chemical partner such as carbon." Those aren't two separate processes.
jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Several other statements in that article are questionable.

Ouch. I'm trying to avoid reading that. I may be painful. <g>
Carbon is soluble in iron, up to around 0.02%. But so is silica, which is part of the slag in wrought iron, and which is reduced to silicon before it goes into solution in the iron.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can always edit the article. Anyone can. Karl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.