Salt and Vinegar - Rust removal from cast iron

I've tried the vinegar saturated with salt method to sucessfully remove rust from steel items.

Does anyone know if the same vinegar/salt solution can be used can be used on cast iron pieces?

Mike Eberlein

Reply to
mikee
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I'd be surprised if it didn't work. Steel is 98% iron after all. - GWE

Reply to
Grant Erwin

"Grant Erwin" wrote: I'd be surprised if it didn't work. Steel is 98% iron after all. - GWE ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Furthermore, iron oxide is iron oxide, and that's what you're dissolving.

Reply to
Leo Lichtman

It worked for me. Degrease as well as possible before doing this.

Jim

Reply to
jim rozen

More accurately, iron is 95% steel ;)

(Yep, it's weird like that...)

Tim

-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @

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Reply to
Tim Williams

Just don't try to de-rust spring steel. Gerry :-)} London, Canada

Reply to
Gerald Miller

I don't see your joke. Maybe you are confusing "cast iron" with elemental Iron.

Reply to
bw

Thanks, Jim. I was hoping someone had actually tried it. I've got a relatively expensive casting I want to derust, and it was either the vinegar solution or beadblasting to remove the stuff.

Mike Eberle> >

Reply to
mikee

Well, the average piece of 1020 mild steel is about 98-99% elemental iron. The remainder is mostly manganese and a smidge of carbon (0.2 +/- 0.05% is the specification). The average gray cast iron (iron now referring to the cast mixture rather than the element) has 1-3% silicon and 2-4% carbon. It can also have manganese, nickel, etc.

Tim

-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @

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Reply to
Tim Williams

Or -- electrolytic rust removal.

Enjoy, DoN.

Reply to
DoN. Nichols

Thus contradicting your own 'in' joke. Steel comprises 98-99% iron, as the OP said.

Reply to
John Smith

I've used both to good advantage. Honestly the electrolytic method does have an edge over the salt/vinegar approach, as the residue left behind is a bit less troublesome. Though it is somewhat more trouble as it requires a power supply, etc.

Jim

Reply to
jim rozen

No, Jim. It means you have a good reason to buy a 12v battery charger to add to the tool collection.

Steve.

Reply to
SteveF

I have to agree. The iron used in making laminations for motors and transformers typically is carbon free.

Harold

Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos

The bead blasting offers a (minor) benefit due to the peening action, and will generally improve the surface, so given a choice between the two, if you're trying to improve the object, I think I'd choose the bead process.

Harold

Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos

Uh. My joke meant the composition "cast iron", which was in the context (machine tools are very, very rarely made of 99.9% pure iron).

Tim

-- "I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!" - Homer Simpson Website @

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Reply to
Tim Williams

The trouble with bead blasting is, solid metal is removes as well as oxide. For machine tools it's obvious to try to maintain as much accuracy as possible when doing this - as a very smart person once pointed out to me.....

The electrolytic method does not touch the unoxidised metal.

Jim

Reply to
jim rozen

Chuckle!! Ok, I agree, assuming it's a machine tool he's talking about. If it's a rusty old water pump that he wants to paint for display, I might feel differently. He didn't really say. I'm not sure any of the procedures is as good as never having to deal with the problem in the first place.

Bead blasting is supposed to remove little to nothing from the base metal, but with cast iron I'm not convinced it doesn't. For certain it removes the free graphite from the surface. I know it has precious little affect on stainless.

Harold

Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos

molasses (say a cup) in a bucket of water also works well, if slow ( think a week or two...) and tends to be smelly.....

Leaves the cast completely clean back to grey, after a brush up. Will rust again though...

russ

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