possible to bronze overlay ductile iron / continous cast iron ?

is it possible to tig braze overlay on ductile iron or continuous cast type
iron /
what procedure ?
rod?
thanks for the info
Reply to
williamhenry
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\ Sure. Works fine. Use Silicon bronze, aluminum bronze, nickle bronze, or tin bronze.
Stay away from anything with Zinc in it, such as low fuming gas brazing rod.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
What is meant by "overlay"? Thanks in advance, David Todtman
Reply to
David Todtman
Covering a large area with a layer of metal. Basically row upon row of weld beads. Very common in hardfacing and buildup of worn parts.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
thanks Ernie , any suggestions on technique to keep the parent material from out gassing , I am getting a bubbling type thing , am I getting it too hot ?
Reply to
williamhenry
If you are layering bronze onto cast iron I have to ask what condition the cast iron is in?
Is it a used crank case housing or some other thing that would be saturated in oil.
Cast iron has a porous surface that tends to absorb contaminants so if the part has such contamination you will have problems with stuff burning out as you go.
The only solution I know of to remove soaked in stuff is to put the whole piece in a hot alkali cleaning machine as used for engine blocks.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
I tried to write some letters in stainless steel using silicon bronze. The hope was to have a stainless steel background with copper colored letters. There was a lot of mixing with the base material and I ended up with a dirty brown with poorly defined edges. It sure did not look very good.
Is there a way to do this without mixing with the base metal? All I know about it is it's stainless. I don't know what kind.
Mike
Reply to
Mike
the cast iron is from the gland and pistons of large hydraulic cylinders so oil contamination is most likely the problem , we are soaking the parts in acetone overnight then drying them in an oven at 250 for three hours before starting to weld
Reply to
williamhenry
Well if you can't get the parts to a hot solvent (carbon tetrachloride) or a hot caustic parts washer, then acetone isn't too bad.
You may be better off heating the area with a torch to help burn out any contaminants before laying the bronze on.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Incise the letters into the SS with a die grinder, then fill the grooves with silicon bronze using 1 amp per each 0.002" of thickness.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler

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