Stove grate repair

I just got a call from the guy I buy my compressed gasses from wanting me
to weld up some cracks in a stove grate . I'm thinking plain phosphor bronxe
filler might not take the heat , and am looking for opinions on what to use
. Looks like my choices are Ni-99 , Ni-55 , silicon bronze . or cast iron
filler . Will CI or SB require peening , like the nickel does ? Or is
the grate in/on firebricks to retain the heat while I work on it or possibly
bury it in dry sand .
Which would you use ? I do know that whatever I use it's going to need
preheat and a slow cooldown . I'm thinking a nice wood fire should handle
both since I don't have anything else to preheat a piece about 11 x 13 .
He won't be bringing it for a couple of weeks , so I have time to order
some filler as soon as I decide which to use .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Loading thread data ...
Why did the grate crack?
Will it crack again somewhere else?
Weld it with Nickel 55 (with preheat and slow cooling) and collect your money immediately.
It probably will crack again somewhere.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus27493
I don't know why it cracked . I'll be ordering some Ni rod in the next day or two , looks like the best option . I wish I could find some nickel rod in TIG filler , but have come up empty on that search - I'm a better TIG weldor than stick ...
Reply to
Terry Coombs
It is handy to have some nickel rod.
They sell it in tig filler form also at McMaster Carr.
It is very expensive.
I have a small collection of all kinds of welding rods, including nickel rod. I used it a couple of times.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus27493
I offered you some invar 42. I think I called it invar 41. I did check on the size. It is .093 diameter. And I think you have some 312 stainless. I could send you some more of that.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
I had to look up Invar , that stuff sounds like exactly what I need . .093 sounds like 3/32 , a good size for what I'm going to be doing . Since this stuff has such a low coefficient of thermal expansion it should work well for a stove grate ... I do have some 312 that was in the package you sent me before , haven't used any of it yet except to see how it handles , probably don't need any more at this time but a few pieces of that invar would sure be nice .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Is this a wood Stove ?
If so grates are not to be used. Wood on top of the blocks of insulation cement.
The wood stove gets to hot inside and burns them up. It also uses up a high amount of room.
I was a 17 year user of a wood stove and would have one here but have a fireplace. Wood stove in several years as an insert.
Martin
Reply to
Martin Eastburn
The grate I added to my woodstove last year, to distribute air under the fire all the way to the back and keep it from clogging with charcoal, is scrap (mis-)perforated stainless sheet bent into a low arch. It does the job and has held up very well so far, as have the stainless replacement side baffles I installed at least 10 years ago. -jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Gotta disagree with you Martin . My primary heat here is a wood burning stove , a King Circulator . It has a grate with an ash pan underneath , and the lower half of the firebox is lined with fire brick . A properly maintained fire will not heat the grate as much as you might think , air circulation keeps it from overheating .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
As a kid I built a natural-draft metal casting furnace whose grate was a broken garden rake, which supported the weight of the fuel and lead without bending. -jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I'm not a welder and I suspect you need top preheat a larger area, But this is cool for preheating a smaller piece.
Mikek
Reply to
amdx
That's pretty cool ! I do need a larger area heated though , the grate is about 11x13 inches . I haven't decided yet whether to use a wood fire or build a fire brick enclosure and use one of my foundry burners . I'm leaning towards the firebrick/burner option just because it's cleaner and I'll have better control . Have you seen the youtube videos where they use the same induction principle to melt metal without a crucible ? Kinda cool to see a blob of molten aluminum hanging in the air .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Yes I've watched several of them. Here's a induction heater board for $34.
You do need a power supply though. 48V at 20 amps.
4 car Batteries ;-)
Reply to
amdx
Put it in your ptopane bar-b-que to preheat it, then weld it (preferably TIG) with either nickel rod made for cast iron, or stainless steel mig wire. I've had good luck on grey castings with stainless wire with a real good pre-heat.
Reply to
clare
My entire box was firebrick. The top was a steel plate for reflow and reheating of the gas as it flowed above it. It was a double burn system.
Mine was over 500 pounds and served us well. It heated a 1500 square foot house with high ceilings. A large A-Frame.
Sounds like you have a coal burner. Those have grates. But maybe a coal burner company made wood burners and kept their concept working.
But from where I used one, I never saw a grate machine and was told flat out not to use any.
Martin
Reply to
Martin Eastburn
This is a common stove in this area. It can burn wood or coal. There are a LOT of outfits that make them, but they look very similar. Used to use one to heat the old shop.
formatting link
Reply to
Steve W.
Hey Terry, if you haven't yet welded the grate I may have some info to help. I found an unopened package of the rod I used in the past for stick welding cast iron and it is a Stoody product called CASTWELD 55. It was pretty easy rod to run so even though you said you are better at TIG than Stick you should be able to weld with the stuff. Or, you can just remove the flux and use it as TIG rod. I have done this and it worked OK. But it really works better for stick welding. Eric
Reply to
etpm
I sent Terry some invar 42 , genuine Boeing surplus. The post office says it should be there right after Thanksgiving. Invar 42 is 42 % nickel so should not be drastically different from a 55% nickel rod. At least that was my thoughts when I bought it.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Thanks for the info . I have a package of Invar 42 TIG rod coming , looks like that's also a very good choice . There are a lot of products out there that have 55% nickel , this Invar is 42% , balance is iron from what information I've found online . They call it invar because is doesn't shrink much as it cools . Sounds perfect for a grate that will see a lot of heat cycling .
Reply to
Terry Coombs

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.