Cast Iron CGI/ADI requirements

Hello, I'm writing a report about "cast iron". Could someone tell me which are the requirements of machine tools (e.g. boring, milling...) and
their tools for metalworking cast iron CGI and ADI?
Thank you!
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Hello I'm writing to you because it sounds like you don't know what you want.
for $500 emco mill & immigrant labor your machiniing CAST IRON at a labor rate around 20/hr- for 1Million you'll get a CNC Horizontal with 2 tombstone pallets - your machining CAST IRON at a labor rate of +100/hr
That should answer your vague question.
WTF is CGI & ADI
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cncmillgil wrote:

types of nodular iron -> compacted graphite, austempered ductile     
http://machinedesign.com/article/cast-iron-1115 http://www.fandmmag.com/online/article.jsp?siteSection=4&idE7&pageNum=1
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cncmillgil wrote:

Gil:
    I was curious about that myself. It seems that CGI means Compacted Graphite Iron. And ADI means Austempered Ductile Iron.
    Some info on Compacted Graphite Iron.
=================================================================http://tinyurl.com/yzqdffg
    Compacted graphite iron has the benefit of combining the heat dissipation of gray iron with the strength and modulus of elasticity of ductile iron. However, it has a graphite structure that resembles coral and a chemical composition with the reputation of being somewhat hard to control. =================================================================    Some info on ADI cast iron.
=================================================================http://tinyurl.com/yku9fys
2) AUSTEMPERED DUCTILE IRON (ADI)
ADI Cast iron (Ductile Austempered Iron) is obtained by heat treatment. The latter modifies the microstructure of the basic cast iron to obtain a bainitic type matrix. This cast iron treatment enables reaching mechanical characteristics comparable with those of certain steels. =================================================================    From my cursory glance at cast iron sites it seems that diamond coated tool are often used for machining high performance cast irons.
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Damn, learn sump'in new ever day! hi tek shit.
The only cast material moldmakers ever use was Kirksite, well some do cast S-7 & H13, & theres the old Samsonextra hobbed cavities.
Thx BB
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ADI is not bad. It machines just like regular grey iron, but it makes actual spiral chips when drilling holes. Grey and ductile irons are two of the absolute easiest to machine materials in all of machining. The only tough part is dealing with stuff like porosity and inclusions. Doesn't matter what kind of tooling you have if you hit a half inch diameter piece of gravel in the middle of a rough cut.
Compacted Graphite Iron is a fancy name for shitty iron with lots of graphite in it. It's a lot tougher on tooling.
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At Haas they'd been using CBN inserts on smaller ci parts with great success, so we tried them on roughing the linear guides on the lathe base castings. Using a 4" CBN shell mill, the sparks would shoot 10' across the table! Beautiful... till it hit some porosity or even worse - an old bolt that got dropped into the sandcasting. Ka Bam! Fun while it lasted.
-- Bill
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