80cc Bike Engine Conversion

Has anyone actually ordered one of these, can you comment on the
quality/completeness of the kit? It seems like a decent price, since
it seemingly includes all the handlebar controls, mounting parts, and a
gas tank.
Link:
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best regards,
Martin
Reply to
Martin
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It certainly could have been. I still found the site pretty interesting. The little 2-stroke has a great retro look to it.
Reply to
Jim Stewart
No spam here. I am personally interested in such vehicles, and found that site during one of my frequent searches. I posted the question to this group, and this group alone, because as a longtime participant I have read discussions indicating that we have quite a few guys with experience motorizing a bicycle. These are the type of people likely to have checked out the item for which I supplied a link.
In looking at the engine kit (did you check it out, or just give me a knee-jerk reply?), I thought that it offered quite a bit for $160. For example, the resurrected "Whizzer" company here in Dallas wants about $700 for their engine kit.
The Whizzer components are manufactured in Taiwan. I assume this $160 kit is a Chinese knockoff of something, and I was genuinely hoping to find someone who had been brave enough (or maybe lived near the supplier) to check one out.
best regards,
Martin
Reply to
Martin
You don't want one of those under powered 8 cylinder bikes, you want one of these:
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Reply to
tomcas
FWIW Here in Colorado anything over 50 cc's requires a motorcycle license , insurance and registration. I don't know where you plan on using it but something to think about.
RellikJM
Reply to
RellikJM
Here is a review
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and of course they are even cheaper on Ebay
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My gut reaction is, I like it.
Reply to
tomcas
On Wed, 19 Jan 2005 23:43:16 -0500, the inscrutable tomcas spake:
Shades of TRON! Nah, get some biodiesel and run this puppy:
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
I imagine there are lots of applications. Many folks have a motorcycle license, and registration/insurance for a moped is not expensive. On the other hand, I can imagine scenarios where one would not bother, such as using it to cruise the non-public streets of a large RV park, etc. Of course, you could always pedal it anywhere (no license required to carry an engine around as dead weight) and use the engine for assist when you think violation risk is low.
I don't think the 50cc restriction is universal. For example, when I was a kid in Tennessee, the dividing line between "motorcycle" and "motor-driven cycle" was 5 HP, regardless of displacement. We all rode 90cc Honda motorcycles when we were 14 (moped legal age), thanks to an enterprising dealer who installed (easily-altered) throttle blocks above the carburetor slides and certified them as 5 HP.
Martin
RellikJM wrote:
question to
Reply to
Martin
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Thanks for the links. From the reviews, it appears that there may be some issue with piston galling and seizures. Maybe the chinese aren't that careful what metals they allow to rub together. I note that the ebay seller offers complete replacement engines for $80, though. What a deal!
Martin
Reply to
Martin
Much of this galling problem has to to do with two lubrication problems as opposed to quality problems. Some people use the wrong oil, and most people make the mistake of using the manufactures recommended ratios. These ratios are intentionally weaned out to satisfy the environmentalist. After cooking a brand new leaf blower with 40 to 1, I switched to 16 to 1 (or 20 to 1) on everything,across the board, old or new. 5 years later and I have not had any problems with string trimmers, leaf blowers, and chainsaws.
Reply to
tomcas
The oil I use is called Opti-Lube or some thing like that. It has Opti as the first part of the name. When used according to the package directions the mix ratio is about 100 to 1. It works very well. I use it in all my 2 stroke motors. Chain saw, outboard, etc.. I called the company when using it for the first time several years ago and spoke to the company president. He told me that he collects antique outboards and he uses the oil at 100 to 1 in the old motors. They will replace any motor that fails from lack of lube, such as galling or bearing failure, free of charge. It's more expensive by volume but about the same by use as other oils. The motors run much better with the leaner mixture and plugs foul much less. Here is the web site:
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. I have no connection with any company making or selling this stuff. It just works very well. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
In addition to the other comments, I wonder about the sprocket sizes. The rear sprocket is small enough that I doubt this could be direct-drive off the crankshaft, yet there is no mention of a transmission. I wonder if it just has a simple on-board gear reduction?
Martin
Mart> Has anyone actually ordered one of these, can you comment on the
Reply to
Martin
In the picture, there is a big lump on the rear (right in picture) of the crankcase. There is no reason for that on a 2-smoke without gear reduction, so that's probably the internal gear reduction. Probably also acentrifical clutch like the 60cc engine below it.
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3.5 hp is real dismal power for an 80cc 2-smoke, so it's probably also a low speed engine for an 80cc. Even a not too well designed 80cc 2 smoke shold be able to develop 3.5 hp at about 4,000 rpm.
Dick
Mart> In addition to the other comments, I wonder about the sprocket sizes.
Reply to
D.B.
Don't you just love the "plain-english" descriptions? The kit is made in China, but supposedly the dealer is in Missouri. So, does this 60cc kit have a clutch lever? And is he saying that you'll have to come up with your own, wider, crankshaft?
from the web site: ************************************************** It is an Automatic bicycle motor, It does not have a clutch lever. It has a centrifugal clutch when throttle handle is turned and rpm begins and you go just like a gas scooter. New improved bearings, wider cranks will be needed. Gets around 150 miles on a gallon of gas. With this kit you can convert an ordinary bicycle into a gas powered bike. Operates like a moped. You can pedal the bike or start the engine by releasing the clutch lever. ************************************************** Clear as mud, eh?
Martin
D.B. wrote:
Reply to
Martin
I wish the manual that came with my Chinese Lathe was that clearly written. Wost case of Chinglish I ever saw! Tom
Reply to
Tom Miller
On 20 Jan 2005 08:51:19 -0800, "Martin" vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
"when you think violation risk is low." hehe!
Don't you mean "when you think getting _caught_ risk is low."?
Reply to
Old Nick

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