Just ordered a bike engine

These engine kits are offered from many sellers and the quality seems
to be all over the place. So I don't know what is gonna show up on my
doorstep. I will for sure be making custom mounts because ALL the
mounting options I have seen for these engines have been far from
ideal. I also don't like the gas tanks, mainly because they look like
a gas tank. I have seen several bike conversions that look great.
These were all based on Beach Cruiser type bicycles. However, I am
going to be hanging this engine on my eighteen speed road bike and the
gas tank would just look plain wrong, to me at least. I have already
designed and drawn a new gas tank that has a reserve tank in it. This
will require two gas valves unless I can find a valve I like that has
a reserve position. If anyone here is interested I can post updates on
the conversion. Since metalworking will be involved the posts will be
appropriate.
Eric
Reply to
etpm
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You probably already know this but... The "reserve tank" on my old motorcycles was simply a valve with an off and outlet 1 and 2. We'll call the primary outlet 1 which was simply a tube that stood up higher in the tank. Outlet 2 drew off the bottom.
My current motorcycle (1986 model) has just on/off. It uses an idiot light that comes on when there is maybe 1/3 gallon left. You first notice it when stopping. Goes out again when you get rolling again.
I depend on my trip odometer more than the light. I reset it when I fill up and start looking for fuel at around 100 miles. Around 130 miles I start to get pretty worried;-)
Reply to
Leon Fisk
A motorcycle fuel petcock has a short tube for "reserve" and a long tube for "main"; that way you don't have to worry about building a compartment or baffle inside your tank. You just need one outlet with threads to fit the petcock. I have worked on a 1976 BMW R75/6 that had the Karcoma petcocks seen on the second half of this page
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and they seemed to work well. The internets say
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that they take an M20x1 thread on the tank. Straight thread; there is a gasket that fits inside the nut on the petcock to do the sealing. The output is a nipple for 7 or 8 mm hose. Older models have the hose nipple in line with the tank tubes, and newer ones have it at 90 degrees to the tank tubes. One of these could keep half of a 750 or 900 cc motorcycle engine fed, so it should feed your bike engine OK. I find them for $45-$65 new on the Internets.
I'm sure you can get an equal part off of a Japanese bike from that same era; I just don't know the details.
Standard disclaimers apply: I don't get money or other consideration from any companies mentioned.
Matt Roberds
Reply to
mroberds
Me too. 1600 Meanie for me these days, although I'ld like to sell it and ride my wife's Road Glide since she doesn't ride any more. I wish the Meanie would let me just be worried at 130 miles. LOL.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
The last bike I had was a 1949 Harley 74 and I just used to open up the tank cap and look in :-)
Reply to
John B.
I had one of those mounted on my mountain bike. Came with the optional bent crankshaft and chrome tank. Just to get an idea of what they are like you should strap a chainsaw between your legs. Industrial ear protection is recommended.
Reply to
wws
I have seen several up close and running. I have watched folks riding them and my brother rode one while I watched. His report was that the engine did not vibrate badly. I have also read a lot about bad engines and good ones. Your bent crank option was apparently included in many of the engines. It seems like kind of a crap shoot. I am gonna start the engine before I mount it to see how well it runs and if it vibrates badly. Eric
Reply to
etpm
Thanks for the advice Matt. I looked at the Karcoma petcocks and like the look. Since I'm cheap I will be looking for used petcock. I already have a couple valves I like but it would be better to just have one. Eric
Reply to
etpm
Sounds like my '49 VW. You could stick your hand down the filler pipe to determine how much gas was left. Used to joke about just dropping the jerry can i nto the tank instead of pouring the gas from the can to the tank.
Reply to
clare
That is cool. We lost engineman aka John Taylor a few years ago who after getting his 1/4 scale coal burning (I got him up on propane) boiler Steam engine. He then turned his bicycle into a steam engine bicycle. Sad thing, his shop went to the trailer house area but the bicycle is not to be seen. Someone trashed it fast or grabbed it.
Martin
Reply to
Martin Eastburn
Back on 8/10/2015 dpb gave us some information on ISO standards for tractor CAT lifts.
I have a John Deer Series 1 tractor - a 1025R with a number of options. Want more... :-)
the Lifting hooks are 28" (tad more) center to center. The slots in the hooks (taking pins up to) are 1 1/2".
Cat 1+ for midpoint spacing, and larger than CAT 2+ on pins.
So the green 3-point bar/hook set behind my Deer is over sized for ease of use. Might be that this inhibits third party gear having fixed center-center larger than a cat 1.
Martin
Reply to
Martin Eastburn
My 81' (yes AMF years) 74" shovel was like that. No worry though since I had put 6 gallon stetches on it. It also got unbelieveable mileage. I think that might be distorted though because of the mileage pushing it. LOL. I sold it to buy my 97 FLHT. Wish I still had that one some days. It wasn't fast, but it wasn't fast about the same running light or pulling a trailer loaded for a week on the road.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Typical VW owner. Sheesh... ;)
They had the large opening for the quick dump jerry cans used at F1.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I thought Shovels were all 80" by 1981 ? My current ride is a '90 Ultra Classic , I go by the trip meter because the gauge isn't all that accurate . My AMF bike was a '76 FLH with all the original goodies , including factory hand shift . I still miss that bike 7 years later . RIP Bag Lady .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Ex VW owner. 1973-74 in Livingstone Zambia. Then I owned an early injected Rabbit for about 6 months here in Ontario. That was enough.
Reply to
clare
Nay! Once a VW owner...
How'd the Wabbit do in the ice and snow?
Reply to
Larry Jaques
In the mid 70's I had a Civic with studded snow tires. When I went out to play on the slippery back roads after a snowstorm the only other cars out doing the same were Saabs and Rabbits.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I bought it in the spring and sold it in September or October.
Reply to
clare
I was "told" that there were some bikes made in that transitional time were they just grabbed parts off the shelf and threw a bike together to get a unit out the door. Mine was definitely a 74" as established when we tore it down and freshened it up. That bike was a night mare. I recall one holiday toy delivery ride where I had to stop and let hydraulid oil out of one of the brake slaves because it was not retracting fully, and one of the brakes was red hot.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
I had forgotten that Fort Frozen Wilderness thawed at times. ;)
Grok Jim's post re: Civics, Saabs, and Wabbits. IIRC, the first front-drive vehicles in the USA were touted as being the safest on ice, with their pulling v. pushing tires. I'd imagine that studded tires would tremendously increase that.
Here are 2 somethings I'll never do, either:
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I haven't yet owned a FWD or 4WD vehicle, but I'd kinda like to have a little bugout diesel motorcycle some day.
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(+ blonde) or
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I loved cruising the trails in me yout.
- To change one's self is sufficient. It's the idiots who want to change the world who are causing all the trouble. --Anonymous
Reply to
Larry Jaques

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