Gasoline powered lathe

Has anyone here ever seen such a beast. Maybe powered from a low speed
gas engine but geared up. This could work for folks off grid or is it
just simpler to run a genny and forget the gas or diesel.
Reply to
daniel peterman
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (daniel peterman) wrote in news:568-45849469-725 @storefull-3232.bay.webtv.net:
Rather than trying to power JUST the lathe with an engine - a relatively recent innovation brought about by the development of small, strong, electric motors - why not consider having one drive a multiple belt arrangement as was, once, the industrial [and farm] standard?
BTW, the belt system could, also, be powered by a vehicle (car, truck, tractor, garden tractor, etc.), a water wheel or be wind-powered.
If electricity is to be used for OTHER equipment (drills, saws, mills, compressors, etc.) then a generator has its appeal.
Reply to
RAM³
Lots of the old lineshaft shops were gas engine powered. I've seen one that had a Ford T engine as motive power.
Before rural electrification, it was not uncommon to run a gas engine for similar reasons, and there were plans and casting kits available to run off of town gas for similar purposes.
I have seen a few write-ups in Model Engineer magazine about these town gas engines.
I think the lineshaft idea has the most merit. Use a clutch in the drivetrain to turn the lathe on and off, with the noisy engine running on the other side of a wall.
Of course, a genset could be used to run any number of appliances, not just those that could be lineshaft powered, like a straight engine could power.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
There is a fellow locally that has a Bridgeport mill with a vertical shaft gasoline engine running it. He didn't have three phase and was using the mill on wood only so wanted very high speed so now he has a 5000 rpm engine with a throttle. He says it works fine bt I am sure the fumes would get to me real soon. Leigh at MarMahine
Reply to
CATRUCKMAN
Our line shafts were powered by a one-lung natural gas engine. There were wooden boards bolted on some of the belt wheels that moved air for cooling the people. I'm still trying to figure out how they powered shafts at 90 degree angles, 20 feet away.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Now there is something to get a picture of! Redneck milling machine.
Reply to
clutch
I dont see why not. Shrug..Ive washed clothes in a gasoline washing machine and repaired sails on a gasoline powered sewing machine.
Gunner
Political Correctness
A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
Reply to
Gunner
Any gasoline powered marital aids?
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Sure..my old Rambler wagon got lots of slam time. All..all the seats folded down.
And it got great! mileage. then of course..
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Gunner Political Correctness
A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
Reply to
Gunner
Yeah I had one of those Maytag twin cylinder jobbies. Would run a long time on just a half gallon of gas. I have a couple spare snowmobile engines just sittin here and a nifty countershaft for flat belts with a clutch of some sort and was thinking if I put them together I could run a lathe or shaper without the genset. The engines put out around 30 ponies wide open throttle but at partial they might make 10 hp and not be that loud
Reply to
daniel peterman
Or just an Amish-owned converted one. BTDTST (Been There Done That Seen That) Gas or diesel engine powered lineshafts to run a lineup of metal and woodworking equipment.
One should be able to find examples in many Amish communities.
Now there are folk who, if TEOTWAWKI happens, probably won't notice. They might be a bit put out if they have to go back to steam, wind, or water power. :)
Reply to
John Husvar
On Sat, 16 Dec 2006 22:53:03 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com quickly quoth:
Question: Why do rednecks have to be milled?
-- "Not always right, but never uncertain." --Heinlein -=-=-
Reply to
Larry Jaques
On Sat, 16 Dec 2006 21:46:38 -0800, with neither quill nor qualm, "Tom Gardner" quickly quoth:
Nah. He was younger and had much more stamina way back then.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
One of the local Amish shops has one. The place is a complete woodworking and cabinet shop. Band saws, lathes, table saws, jointer, thickness planer all powered by Honda engines. Next door he has a nice blacksmiths shop that is powered by a pair of diesels. That one is all lineshaft powered though. I visit every week or so and get to step back in time.
Reply to
Steve W.
It's faster and easier than getting them to take a bath?
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
Because they are too coarse.
Reply to
clutch
To get the rough edges off.
Reply to
clare at snyder.on.ca
Twisted belts.
Reply to
clare at snyder.on.ca
What's aharley other than a gasoline powered vibrator??
Reply to
clare at snyder.on.ca
That sounds cool. If I live another year I might visit that place. Amish folk are very crafty and stick to their ways with gusto. Very admirable
Reply to
daniel peterman

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