Workshop Condensation - ideas?

Long post follows.....
I've got a problem with condensation in my workshop I can't understand.
I'm getting condensation on the bottom side of the metal beam above the
doorway. It extends about 1 foot to the left of the door. The other roof
beams stay dry, it only appears to condense above the door and a little
to each side of the door.
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Initially I thought it was roof leakage so I lifted the cladding and
replaced the metal flashing angle, sealing both sides well with a
copious amount of silicone sealant.
I found the condensation was still occurring and thought that it may be
damp air drawn into the shed at night via the gap between the door and
the door frame. I figured the moisture was condensing on the cool metal
beam (the cladding is screwed to the top side of this beam) so I
purchased some neat fitting self adhesive rubber seal. I fitted this
across the top and down the sides of the door. The bottom of the door
has a wiper type storm seal.
Despite this on >>rainless nights
Reply to
Shed_Fiddler
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amdx fired this volley in news:lrvt6o$hop$1@dont- email.me:
There are foam ball-filled paints that offer the same feature in a rolled-on application. One could even 'dope up' a can of latex paint with a beanbag full of polybeads, and just spatula the stuff on. In fact, I've seen and once used a pre-mix version of that, though I cannot remember where I got it. It's the consistency of spackle, and about 90% polybeads.
Or you could 'baggie' the beam, and fill it with some low-expansion (door and window) foam.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
That's what I was trying to convey, the door and window foam. I wonder how it would come out of you pinched or restricted the tube on one of the door and window foam cans? Could you get a spray?
Mikek
Reply to
amdx
amdx fired this volley in news:lrvtv1$nfg$1@dont- email.me:
No, not a useful one. 'Boxing' the beam with some light framing, then filling the void end-to-end would be the easiest way with that material. You could even use a piece of plastic gutter material as the trough.
All that said, it would prevent the drip, but not expose the underlying cause. I'm prone to 'waste' the time it would take to understand it before I worked around the problem. It might not be soluble without extensive structural changes. Then the foam would be the ideal solution.
But it also might be as simple as pulling out a few screws, sliding in a thermal barrier between roof and beam, and putting the screws back in.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Thanks for the ideas guys.
I like the idea of insulating the beam surface. I may be able to find some thin self adhesive insulation - cheap & effective.
The thermal barrier idea is interesting but will be difficult as I initially thought is was water leakage (its winter here) and I've pretty much glued the cladding to the beam with silicone rubber (silastic). The thing I don't get is that the beam is the full length of the workshop and it only gets condensation over the top of the door frame. Everything else is equal - that's why I figured it was from air leakage around the door.
I'll head to our big hardware retailer and see what insulation they have.
Cheers.
Reply to
Shed_Fiddler
Also, make sure you seal it well so no air can circulate, otherwise the insulation you have installed keeps the beam from warming and the air that does circulate, has the water condense out on the beam.
Reply to
amdx
I'll offer a contrarian view: your condensation results from cold iron and moist air. Since moisture is NOT a good thing, put MORE cold iron up there (I'm thinking a galvanized pipe with water fill, lotsa pounds per foot) and pitch it so the condensation collects at a drain or drains. If you see beads form, apply wetting agent (or some of that sheeting-action auto finish) so the water flows to the drain. I like 'amdx' suggestion to foam insulate the beam (so it doesn't rust).
Reply to
whit3rd
That's an interesting idea, unfortunately not really practical to do in my shed though. When I get a chance I'm going to get some insulation and cover the part of the beam that's giving me trouble. Next summer I'll put some more sealant on the outside of the single layer brick wall to try to further reduce moisture ingress.
Cheers.
Reply to
Shed_Fiddler
For a birds-eye view, since the early 1990's, this topic has come up over and over.
Usually, the indoor humidity threads end with deciding to increasing circulation in that area (sometimes with adding and running a window-air-conditioner away from the window and put where the most condensation is collecting).
Reply to
mogulah
> Long post follows..... > > > > > > I've got a problem with condensation in my workshop I can't understand. > > > > I'm getting condensation on the bottom side of the metal beam above the > > doorway. It extends about 1 foot to the left of the door. The other roof > > beams stay dry, it only appears to condense above the door and a little > > to each side of the door. > > > > > >
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(1).JPG > > > >
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(2).JPG > > > > > > > > Initially I thought it was roof leakage so I lifted the cladding and > > replaced the metal flashing angle, sealing both sides well with a > > copious amount of silicone sealant. > > > > > > I found the condensation was still occurring and thought that it may be > > damp air drawn into the shed at night via the gap between the door and > > the door frame. I figured the moisture was condensing on the cool metal > > beam (the cladding is screwed to the top side of this beam) so I > > purchased some neat fitting self adhesive rubber seal. I fitted this > > across the top and down the sides of the door. The bottom of the door > > has a wiper type storm seal. > > > > > > Despite this on >>rainless nights
Reply to
mogulah

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