Zone question

In your building code zone, when is a structure considered a building? I need to read up on that. duh. Some places, it is when it is enclosed.
Some cases it is when it is electrified. Some places, if there are any habitable spaces. Just wondering how it is where you live. I live in an agricultural 1 district, single family. One acre minimum lot size. Five acre minimum for a septic.
Steve
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On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 20:14:09 -0700, "Steve B"

I get training in property tax review annually. At least in MN, it goes by if there is a foundation. For example an animal confinement on skids, even if huge, is not a building. Put a row of cement blocks down and it is a building. A greenhouse with a dirt floor and posts is not a building. Put down blocks or a floor, its a building.
Karl
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On Tue, 11 Oct 2011 07:25:57 -0500, Karl Townsend

The land use ordinances in my town refer only to "structures" -- no mention of "buildings". Our definition of structure borders on the absurd in its scope and inconsistency. When the issue comes up in my role as chair of our Board of Appeals, I often point out that a lawn chair arguably qualifies as a structure. On the other hand, in practice, the codes office is generally reasonable in its application of the definition.
************ Structure - anything built for the support, shelter or enclosure of persons, animals, goods or property of any kind, together with anything constructed or erected with a fixed location on or in the ground, exclusive of fences and poles, wiring, and other equipment normally associated with service drops as well as guying and guy anchors. The term includes, but is not limited to, structures temporarily or permanently located, such as decks, satellite dishes, and portable prefab structures. Other examples of structure include terraces, patios and other construction involving impermeable and/or non-vegetated surfaces.
--
Ned Simmons

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... Sounds like you and I have the exact same job. What is your guide line as to what structures pay property taxes?
I am REALLY NOT looking forward to the board of review this spring. At the last second our wonderful state legislature gutted the homestead property tax credit. This credit reduced your taxes on the first 100K of property value. They were smart and got it shoved through with no one noticing till it was too late.
Talk about a regressive tax. The folks living in the least expensive homes will really get whacked with a huge tax incease. In our area that's mostly the people that can least afford it. AND they won't understand that's its not the county, city or township, and school that's hitting them.
Karl
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On Tue, 11 Oct 2011 10:19:24 -0500, Karl Townsend

My job (1) is on what most towns call the Zoning Board of Appeals. Since there's no zoning in this town, we're just the Board of Appeals. The boards hears appeals of decisions made by the codes enforcement officer, plumbing inspector, and Planning Board and requests for variances. It sounds like you hear appeals of tax assessments.
Theoretically all structures are assessed, but accessory structures seem to be valued well below market or replacement cost. For example, my wife's 20x24, 1-1/2 story, heated painting studio is assessed at $7000. I think the 12x18 garden shed is $250.
(1) I use the term loosely -- we get $10 per meeting <g>.
--
Ned Simmons

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wrote:

I got you beat big time in the pay department - $600 a year. Works out to about $2 an hour. Just today I had two meetings, had to deal with an irrate person that was mad about having a box elder tree cut down in front of his property. Then conferred with the school board chair and the local city mayor about how we are going to politic the state legislature for funds on a badly needed infrastructure improvement.
Karl
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I have two containers. Each has six supports, 16 x 16 solid concrete blocks, and there is air under the containers. I have roofed it, and eventually, hopefully soon, make double doors on each end to fully enclose it. The middle, it will be concreted, but no concrete will go under the containers except for one foot to collect any runoff and channel it away. If it absolutely had to, the whole thing could be moved out in less than one day if I had a crane ready.
I had a discussion with an old neighbor who used to be the assessor. He said the county makes sweeps every five years to catch what they can, and then hit you with an increase in taxes based on what it is. Shouldn't be much.
I read the codes last evening, but what I could find on line didn't have the exact answer. It did say that many buildings made to aid in agriculture (I'm in an ag zone) didn't have to be even permitted, including pole barns, lean tos, carports, shades, animal refuges, etc. It only seems to refer to habitable structures in an AG1 zone.
I thought it may be the point where I enclose it that it would be considered a structure. I'll plug up around the bottom with steel sheet skirting, and go through and seal a lot of air infiltration spots with expanding foam and custom cut patches, so that I can keep it cooler in summer and warmer in winter.
Thanks for the info.
Steve
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My town considers anything 100 square feet and over taxable and so far has ignored my 8' x 10' temporary storage sheds. Go ask them.
jsw
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wrote:

My town considers anything 100 square feet and over taxable and so far has ignored my 8' x 10' temporary storage sheds. Go ask them.
jsw
I did before I bought the containers, and they said in an Ag1 zone I needed nothing.
Steve
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On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 20:14:09 -0700, "Steve B"
SNIP ....... One acre minimum lot size. Five

Hey Steve,
Can't answer your question (my usual state for replies), but the post does bring up a question for me...Why 5 acres to have a septic system, and what do you require for waste if you have less than that?? Is it the local strata?
We are situated on 27 feet of sand, and have a 120' X 160' lot, and we are on septic as is the whole town (poupation 1,000 people, approx. 450 homes).
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
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On Tue, 11 Oct 2011 11:40:50 -0400, Brian Lawson

Be glad you're a Canuck. Here in the states, small towns with all private sytems are having the entire sytem condemned and a central sewer system mandated. I know of three small towns and one large lake here in MN. The same thing is happening in the FL keys. The costs are astronomical.
Karl
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On Tue, 11 Oct 2011 12:16:10 -0500, Karl Townsend

Where I live, Island County, which is two islands, Whidbey Island and Camano Island, in Western Washington, septic system failures are an increasing problem because so many systems are old and were originally built for smaller houses, many of them summer homes. As these homes were remodeled into larger buildings the septics were grandfathered in. However, instead of just condemning the systems all the counties in Western Washington are requiring periodic septic inspections. If the system passes then no changes are required. Island County offers free classes to owners of property with septic systems that teach one how to inspect the complete septic system. Included in the training are instructions to make the two needed inspection tools out of PVC pipe. Or you can borrow them from the county. The instructors emphasised the fact that owners can save from $50.00 to over $300.00 by doing the inspection themselves and that they can also avoid pumping the tank out too often which costs at least $350.00. This is a case of our government doing the right thing and actually saving us money. Much better than just heavy handed condemning. Of course you can lie on the forms when you do the inspection yourself, but at least you will know yourself if your system has problems. Then you may or may not take steps to fix the situation. But most people will do the right thing. Most people already do the right thing most of the time. Eric
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...Are you on well water too? Does your well water line into the house have a UV treatment set-up?
We too have a minimum of either 3 or 5 acres for a septic in my town, but we are 100% septic and 100% well water... Here in NJ.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 x113 01.908.542.0244 Flagship Site: http://www.Drill-HQ.com Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com Production Tapping: http://Production-Tapping-Equipment.com / VIDEOS:
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V8013-R
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On Tue, 11 Oct 2011 11:40:50 -0400, Brian Lawson wrote:

Either the soil is really, really impermeable, or whoever sets the local building codes are a bunch of d***heads.
AFAIK sand is about the most delightful stuff to have for septic -- in fact, in Oregon when you have really impermeable soil the required solution is often to dig out a huge chunk of the clay soil and replace it with sand, into which is laid ones leaching field.
They call 'em "sandboxes".
--
www.wescottdesign.com

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On 10/11/2011 1:06 PM, Tim Wescott wrote:

Tim, here in Central Oregon much of the land is solid rock, so the septic solution is a big pile of sand over the top of perforated PVC pipe leach field. We see them all over here at Crooked River Ranch. Many of the systems have to be pumped to the drain field. One place we looked at had the liquid pumped up over a hill and then gravity took it down to a drain field.
Personally, we are lucky, as the first owner spent the money to excavate the hardpan and lay in a proper drain field. The sand and gravel backfill lets the liquid evaporate within 20-25 feet of the septic tank, as indicated by rank green grass.
We have about 18 inches of volcanic ash and rock rubble, here. Under that is million year old same stuff, but locked together into concrete. Only penetrable when wet.
Paul
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wrote:

No, it is the local government wanting to keep this a rural town and keep out the developers who would put rows upon rows of cookie cutter houses needing an expensive sewer line. They have things just like they like them, and they are not going to let them change. Currently, one cannot get a commercial or manufacturing license. Home occupancy permits are the only thing being granted. We are stuck in time, and like it.
Steve
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Hey Steve,
OK...thanks for the reply.
Brian Lawson.
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