Alternatives To Piano Wire

Hi
I'm looking to source a replacement for the piano wire that I currentl
use for making drive systems for model powerboats.
My requirements would be 0.063" and 0.078" diameters (or nearest metri
equivalents), dead straight (or as near to dead straight as i
possible!) and true.
The problem with all the piano wire I've managed to source so far i
that it has a marked "notchiness" when rotated - I assume this is dow
to inclusions and/or laminations in the wire - and is never straigh
and true.
What alternatives to piano wire in these diameters are available?
Cheers,
Pau
--
Mr Cran
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Mr Crane
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2mm mig wire ...if such a thing exists .
you can have stainless or copper plated mild steel wire
all the best.mark
Reply to
mark
What about silver steel, 1/16" & 2mm are the nearest.
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found on the web , no connection.
Andy M
Reply to
andyengine
Hi,
You could try silver steel. It is a high quality, high-carbon steel alloy stock that is ground to size. It can be hardened easily if required. Suitable for use with plain or ball race bearings.
Available at all engineer's suppliers such as Cromwell Tools (
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. M_T Professional Engineer.
Reply to
Toolmaker
MIG wire is required to be bent (by spec, for the contact). You *can* get straight MIG-wire, but only in huge drums (never saw them live).
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
I've heard that printers have these metal shafts in them that are hardened and ground and well up to quite a few other uses ..
take a trip to a computer shop ...bet they will be glad to give you all the old defunct printers they have .
all the best.mark
Reply to
mark
Hmmm ... how long? Could you use spring wire? Once when I flew R/C, I used spring wire for controll rods. Is that what you want to do? Or do you want to drive propellers or the like at high rpm?
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Are you using it for a drive shaft? Keep in mind piano wire is sold coiled.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
On the nail.
:D
Silver steel is looking good - I'm going to try some and see how i works out.
Thanks everyone
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Mr Crane
Piano wire as sold in model shops is in straight lengths. It sometimes (but not always) displays striations which are presumably marks from drawing. It is often possible to pick out a good piece assuming that the shop has a decent amount actually in stock. Rather hit and miss 'though.
Peter
Reply to
Peter J Seymour
"Pivot steel"? aka Arbor steel. Usually in short lengths (4 1/2 inches), but a range of Stubbs gauge diameters. From any good clock material supplier, or even maybe from me (let me know if you want me to check through my assortment).
Reply to
Autolycus
That's the problem - "hit and miss" as you say. I need something tha is more consistent quality-wise
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Mr Crane
I've seen it sold that way but I've always assumed that even that came off a roll and was straightened some where along the way.
I'm curious if the OP built a frame so that he could tension a length wire and bake it in an oven at 500F to see if the relaxation of stresses would make for a better drive shaft.
A steel pipe, a couple endcaps and two eyebolts and a couple nuts would make a tensioning fixture. Wire goes inside the pipe.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
If I had the time, space and access to eqpt necessary, I'd like t tinker with that. However, I'd rather just buy it off the shelf..
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