Cutting micrometer threads?

Occasionally I've come across a reference to a scientific instrument makers having a micrometer thread cutting machine. Is this any
different from a precision screw cutting lathe?
Is the material from which the spindle of a micrometer soft enough to turn? I'd like to modify one to have truncated cone shaped tips (like a Starett 210) for measuring the distance between watch balance jewels.
Clearly I need to avoid the type with carbide anvil/spindle tips, which seem to be the ones most frequently found second hand, but I imagine older ones may have lacked this refinement.
Alan
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Hi Alan
My understanding of such machines was that they were based on the concept of a thread-follower or chase screw cutting arrangement - see for example:
http://www.lathes.co.uk/schaublin/page19.html and http://www.lathes.co.uk/lorch/page26.html
for some examples of this sort of thing on a lathe - in general they were designed to create very accurate, but limited length, threads.
Cheers,
Youra.

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I had never thought of such a system used for this purpose, but it certainly does make sense since the length of thread required is very limited. I have seen a lathe in action (I think it was from Cambridge Instrument company) which was equipped with the chase screwcutting system, which was being used to cut a very short thread on a photographic lens mount.
The Schaublin system looks very complex (and presumably expensive). The Karger (http://www.lathes.co.uk/karger/page2.html) is more like the system which I have seen.
Alan

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