Small precision lathe which can thread cut

After being allowed to use a Hardinge HLV-H for a few awkward screwcutting jobs (e.g. small diameter inside threads in very hard material), going back
to using an ordinary lathe for thread cutting seems a bit hard.
My workshop space doesn't run to a machine of this size and weight, so I've been looking for smaller precision lathes which can be used for screw cutting. Such a machine would inevitably be less rigid and thus less good at cutting threads in extra-hard materials than the Hardinge, but is there any well known outstanding example?
The usual precision small lathes (Schaublin 70, 102, Lorch, Boley) that I have used tend to be plain or have chase screwcutting, which is good for making optical compoments with short threads of a limited number of pitches, but doesn't meet my needs for a general purpose thread cutting lathe. I know schaublin thread cutting attachments exist which connected via universal joints to the end of the topslide feedscrew, but none of the machines I used had such an accessory, so I do not know what it is like to use.
The only quality small lathe I have seen with "traditional" screwcutting is the Lorch LAS, but I've never used one. Are there any other obvious options I have not thought about?
Alan
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On 09 Dec 2011 00:08:43 +0000 (GMT), Alan Bain

The Cowells 90ME lathe has the "traditional" screw cutting gear setup with banjo to drive the leadscrew although it is only supplied with a fine feed set of gears and no screw cutting set of gears is available from them. I suspect that the gears used would be a standard MOD size and could be obtained from gear wheel suppliers. When I get a chance I could measure up the gears and make a stab at working out what module they are.
Jim.
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On Dec 9, 8:31 am, Jim Guthrie wrote:

So as I see it, you are looking for an automated system or one based on chasers like the continental machines you mention. I do not know of any system other than the Mikron one and this is older than the ones you mention. A compromise would be to make a retracting toolholder for the machine you have. George Thomas did a good one for the Myford and this is covered in his book, the design could be adapted for other machines. Peter
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It's really the clutch arrangement on the Hardinge which I like. I have been pointed to the book by Martin Cleve on screwcutting in the lathe for a description of a reversible single tooth clutch arrangement of this type which he fitted to a Myford lathe. Combined with the George Thomas retracting tool holder this looks like it might be a workable solution.
Thanks for the various ideas!
Alan
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On 20 Dec 2011 23:03:31 +0000 (GMT), Alan Bain
Alan,

Just for your information, the Cowells ME90 has a dog clutch on the leadscrew which can either be operated manually by a lever on the clutch, or automatically as an end stop by an adjustable rod on the carriage.
Jim.
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